DOJ Press Release letterhead

  • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
  • Thursday, July 15, 2010
  • WWW.OJP.GOV
  • Contact: Office of Justice Programs
  • (202) 307-0703

Weekly News Brief

Supporting the Field—Laurie O. Robinson, OJP’s Assistant Attorney General, discusses OJP’s grant-making responsibilities and her commitment to a fair and accessible application process in a video included in the July issue of the Justice Resource Update. http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/justiceresourceupdate/july2010/index.htm

Juvenile Justice Topics—The Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention published a Request for Public Comments in the Federal Register on July 8 seeking input about the Council’s efforts in four priority areas: education and at-risk youth, juvenile reentry and transitions into adulthood, racial/ethnic disparities in juvenile justice and related systems, and tribal youth and juvenile justice. Comments must be received by August 9, 2010, to be considered. www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-07-08/pdf/2010-16696.pdf

Alcohol and Crime Web Page—The Bureau of Justice Statistics has created a single resource that presents data on alcohol-related crime from several BJS data collections, including the National Crime Victimization Survey, 1997-2008; National Incident-Based Reporting System, 2007; and the Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities, 2004. Among the selected findings on the Web page are: Alcohol-related incidents with juvenile offenders were more likely to involve female offenders (25 percent) than incidents with adult offenders (18 percent); almost half (47 percent) of victims in alcohol-related incidents of violence involved victims and offenders who were in a domestic relationship; simple assault (68 percent) was the most common violent offense perpetrated by an offender suspected of using alcohol; about 61 percent of alcohol-related violent incidents resulted in an injury to the victim; and, in 2008, 18 percent of victims of violent crime perceived the offender to be under the influence of alcohol, a decline from 24 percent in 1997. http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/index.cfm?ty=tp&tid=101

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