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Part III: Organization and Program Information
Chapter 2: Legislative Authority

HIGHLIGHTS OF CHAPTER:

OFFICE OF JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION
16.523 Juvenile Accountability Block Grants Program (JABG)
16.540 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention - Allocation to States
16.541 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention - Special Emphasis (Program Grants and Discretionary Grants)
16.542 National Institute for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
16.543 Missing Children's Assistance
16.544 Gang-Free Schools and Communities - Community-Based Gang Intervention
16.547 Victims of Child Abuse
16.548 Title V Delinquency Prevention Program
16.549 Part E State Challenge Activities (Challenge Grants)
16.726 Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP)
16.727 Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws Program
16.728 Drug Prevention Program
16.729 Drug-Free Communities Support Program Grants
16.730 Reduction and Prevention of Children's Exposure to Violence (Safe Start)
16.731 Tribal Youth Program
16.732 National Evaluation of the Safe Schools - Healthy Student Initiative
BUREAU OF JUSTICE STATISTICS
16.550 State Justice Statistics Program for Statistical Analysis Centers (SAC)
16.554 National Criminal History Improvement Program (NCHIP)
16.733 National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS)
NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF JUSTICE
16.560 Justice Research, Evaluation, and Development Project Grants
16.561 National Institute of Justice Visiting Fellowships
16.562 Criminal Justice Research and Development- Graduate Research Fellowship Program
16.563 Corrections and Law Enforcement Family Support
16.564 Crime Laboratory Improvement-Combined Offender DNA Index System Backlog Reduction
16.565 National Institute of Justice Domestic Anti-Terrorism Technology Development Program
BUREAU OF JUSTICE ASSISTANCE
16.571 Public Safety Officers' Benefits Program
16.577 Emergency Federal Law Enforcement Assistance
16.578 Federal Surplus Property Transfer Program
16.579 Byrne Formula Grant Program
16.580 Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Discretionary Grants Program (Discretionary Drug and Criminal Justice Assistance Program)
16.592 Local Law Enforcement Block Grants Program
16.597 Motor Vehicle Theft Protection Act Program (Watch Your Car)
16.598 State Identification Systems (SIS) Grant Program
16.606 State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP)
16.607 The Bulletproof Vest Partnership Program
16.608 Tribal Court Assistance Program
16.609 Planning, Implementing, and Enhancing Strategies in Community Prosecution
16.610 Regional Information Sharing Systems Grants (RISS)
16.611 Closed-Circuit Televising of Child Victims of Abuse (CCTV)
16.612 National White Collar Crime Center (NWCCC)
16.613 Scams Targeting the Elderly
16.614 State and Local Anti-Terrorism Training (SLATT)
16.615 Public Safety Officers' Educational Assistance (PSOEA)
OFFICE FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME
16.321 Antiterrorism and Emergency Assistance Program
16.575 Crime Victim Assistance
16.576 Crime Victim Compensation
16.582 Crime Victim Assistance/Discretionary Grants
16.583 Children's Justice Act Discretionary Grants for Native Americans (Children's Justice Act Partnership for Native American Indian Tribes)
CIVIL RIGHTS DIVISION
16.108 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Technical Assistance Program
16.110 Education and Enforcement of the Antidiscrimination Provision of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA)
DRUG COURTS PROGRAM OFFICE
16.585 Drug Court Discretionary Grant Program (Drug Court Program)
CORRECTIONS PROGRAM OFFICE
16.586 Violent Offender Incarceration and Truth in Sentencing Incentive Grants (Prison Grants)
16.593 Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners (RSAT)
16.594 Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Tuberculosis in Correctional Institutions
16.596 Correctional Grant Program for Indian Tribes
VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN OFFICE
16.524 Legal Assistance for Victims
16.525 Grants to Reduce Violent Crimes Against Women on Campus
16.587 Violence Against Women Discretionary Grants for Indian Tribal Governments
16.588 Formula Grants
16.589 Rural Domestic Violence and Child Victimization Enforcement Grant Program
16.590 Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies and Enforcement of Protection Orders
16.591 Managing Released Sex Offenders
EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF WEED AND SEED
16.595 Executive Office for Weed and Seed (Weed and Seed Program)
OFFICE FOR DOMESTIC PREPAREDNESS
16.007 State Domestic Preparedness Equipment Support Program
16.008 State and Local Domestic Preparedness Training Program
16.009 State and Local Domestic Preparedness Exercise Support
16.010 State and Local Domestic Preparedness Technical Assistance
16.599 Local Firefighting and Emergency Services Training
POLICE CORPS
16.712 Police Corps and Law Enforcement Officers Training and Education


OFFICE OF JUVENILE JUSTICE AND DELINQUENCY PREVENTION

FORMULA GRANTS

 

16.523 Juvenile Accountability Block Grants Program (JABG)

AUTHORIZATION: Public Law 105-119, Fiscal Years 1999-2001 Appropriations Act, Pub.L.106-277553 (1998-2000), referencing H.R. 3 (May 3, 1997).

OBJECTIVES: To provide States and units of local government with funds to develop programs to promote greater accountability in the juvenile justice system. To survey the field and identify projects that would benefit from research, demonstration, and evaluation in the 12 purpose areas identified in the JABG Program. To provide training and technical assistance to States and units of local government so they may develop programs outlined in the 12 program areas to promote greater accountability in the juvenile justice system.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: A total of $250 million was appropriated in FY 2000 to be used as follows: Formula grant funds in the amount of $231,273,500 were available for use in the following areas: building, expanding, renovating or operating temporary or permanent juvenile correction or detention facilities, including training for correctional personnel; developing and administering accountability-based sanctions for juvenile offenders; hiring additional juvenile judges, probation officers, and court-appointed defenders, and funding pretrial services for juveniles, to ensure the smooth and expeditious administration of the juvenile justice system; hiring additional prosecutors so that more cases involving violent juvenile offenders can be prosecuted and backlogs can be reduced; providing funding to enable prosecutors to address drug, gang, and youth violence problems more effectively; providing funding for technology, equipment and training to assist prosecutors in identifying and expediting the prosecution of violent juvenile offenders; providing funding to enable juvenile courts and juvenile probation offices to be more effective and efficient in holding juvenile offenders accountable and reducing recidivism; the establishment of court-based juvenile justice programs that target young firearms offenders through the establishment of juvenile gun courts for the adjudication and prosecution of juvenile firearms offenders; the establishment of drug court programs for juveniles so as to provide continuing judicial supervision over juvenile offenders with substance abuse problems and to provide the integrated administration of other sanctions and services; establishing and maintaining interagency information-sharing programs that enable the juvenile and criminal justice systems, schools, and social services agencies to make more informed decisions regarding the early identification, control supervision and treatment of juveniles who repeatedly commit serious delinquent or criminal acts; establishing and maintaining accountability-based programs that work with juvenile offenders who are referred by law enforcement agencies, to protect students and school personnel from drug, gang, and youth violence; implementing a policy of controlled substance testing for appropriate categories of juveniles within the juvenile justice system. Funds in the amount of $7.5 million were available to support research, evaluation, and demonstration projects consistent with this program. Input was solicited from the States to determine which of the 12 areas are most important and where the greatest needs are. This information guided and provided insight for research, evaluation, and demonstration activities under this program. OJJDP is collaborating with other OJP bureaus concerning the implementation of the Research and Evaluation Program. Training and technical assistance funds, in the amount of $5 million, are available to support the 12 program areas targeted by the JABG Program.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Each State and territory (except Palau) is eligible to receive an allocation and award of funds for State and units of local government if the Governor certifies, consistent with guidelines established by the Attorney General, in consultation with Congress, that the State or territory is actively considering, or will consider within 1 year from the date of such certification, legislation, policies, or practices which, if enacted, would qualify the State or territory for a grant. The areas of certification are (1) Prosecution of Juveniles as Adults; (2) Graduated Sanctions; (3) Juvenile Record keeping; and (4) Parental Supervision. Public or private agencies, organizations, or individuals are eligible to apply for discretionary and training and technical assistance funds.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: All States and territories are eligible to receive an allocation and award of funds for State and units of local government. Funds are available to public and private agencies, organizations, or individuals to apply for discretionary and training and technical assistance funds.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Each applicant must submit a completed application, including signed assurances that it will comply with statutory and administrative requirements. The applicant is also required to submit a Governor certification, consistent with guidelines established by the Attorney General, in consultation with Congress, that the State is actively considering, or will consider within 1 year from the date of such certification, legislation, policies, or practices which, if enacted, would qualify the State for the grant. For Research and Evaluation grants, costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Public Law 105-119 allocates 0.5 percent of the appropriated amount for each State and territory and of the total funds remaining, allocates to each State an amount that bears the same ratio as the population of people under the age of 18 living in each State for the most recent calendar year in which the data is available. The Program requires a cash match of 10 percent of total program costs; Federal funds may not exceed 90 percent of total program costs. (Each State and territory that receives money under the JABG program must establish an interest-bearing trust fund to deposit program funds.) Interest derived from the award does not have to be matched, but interest generated from the trust fund cannot be used to match the Federal award. Matching contributions need not be applied at the exact time or in proportion to the obligation of Federal funds. However, the full match amount must be obligated by the end of the 24-month project period. For discretionary grants, no match is required.

 

16.540 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention-Allocation to States

AUTHORIZATION: Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, Section 221-223, Public Law 93-415, as amended; Public Law 95-503, Public Law 95-115, Public Law 96-509, Public Law 98-473, Public Law 100-690, and Public Law 102-586, 42 USC 5631-5633.

OBJECTIVES: To increase the capacity of State and local governments to support the development of more effective education, training, research, prevention, diversion, treatment, accountability based sanctions, and rehabilitation programs in the area of juvenile delinquency and programs to improve the juvenile justice system.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: This program, established by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, allocates formula grant funds to States and territories on the basis of their relative population under age 18. The minimum allocation to each State is $600,000 and to the Territories is $100,000. States/Territories must demonstrate compliance with four core requirements of the JJDP act in order to receive their full allocation of Formula Grants funds. The core requirements are: Section 223(a) (12) (A) deinstitutionalization of status offenders; (13) separation of adults and juveniles in secure custody; (14) removal of juveniles from adult jails and lockups; and (23) the elimination of the disproportionate confinement of minority juveniles, where such conditions exist. The State's allocation will be reduced by 25 percent for each core requirement with which the State is in non-compliance. Technical Assistance: Not in excess of two percent of the funds available each fiscal year to formula grants is available for grants and contracts with public and private agencies, organizations and individuals to provide assistance to States, units of general local governments, and combinations thereof, and local private agencies to facilitate compliance with Section 223 of the JJDP Act and implementation of the State Plan approved by OJJDP. Technical assistance provided under this provision must be coordinated with the State agencies designated to implement the formula grants program. To be eligible for formula grant funds, a State must submit a comprehensive plan applicable to a 3-year period embodying the purposes of the Act and including provisions that: (1) provide for an advisory group appointed by the chief executive of the State to carry out specified functions and to participate in the development and review of the State's juvenile justice plan; (2) provide within 3 years of submission of the initial plan that juveniles who are charged with or who have committed offenses that would not be criminal if committed by an adult, or offenses which do not constitute violations of valid court orders or such non-offenders as dependent and neglected children, are removed from secure juvenile detention and secure correctional facilities; (3) provide that juveniles alleged to be or found to be delinquent and youths within the purview of the deinstitutionalization core requirement not be confined or detained in any institution in which they have contact with adult persons incarcerated because they have been convicted of a crime or are awaiting trial on criminal charges; (4) provide that no juvenile shall be detained or confined in any jail or lockup for adults (with specified exceptions); and (5) provide for programs to eliminate the disproportionate confinement of minority juveniles where such condition exists. Once the plan is approved, each State determines the specific programs to be funded. The States are responsible for processing applications for subgrants and administering funded projects. Two-thirds of funds must be passed through to units of general local government, private nonprofit agencies, and Indian Tribes performing law enforcement functions unless a waiver is granted.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: The Chief Executive of each State which chooses to apply for a formula grant shall establish or designate a State agency as the sole agency for supervising the preparation and administration of the plan, in accordance with the Juvenile Justice Amendments of 1984. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE: Grants and contracts may only be made to agencies, organizations and individuals that have experience in providing technical assistance to State agencies in implementing State plans, and in facilitating compliance with Section 223 of the JJDP Act. (Public Law 102-586).

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Units of a State and its local government, public and private organizations, Indian tribes performing law enforcement functions, and agencies involved in juvenile delinquency prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Formula based on juvenile population. Grantees are required to provide dollar for dollar match on planning and administration funds. Action programs allow no match. At least 66 2/3 percent of the funds received by the State under Section 222(a) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, must be "expended by" or "passed through to" programs of units of general local government, private nonprofit agencies, and Indian tribes performing law enforcement functions, insofar as they are consistent with the State Plan. This provision may be waived at the discretion of the OJJDP Administrator for any State depending upon the extent to which the services for delinquent or potentially delinquent youth are supported on a statewide basis.

 

16.541 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention-Special Emphasis (Program Grants and Discretionary Grants)

AUTHORIZATION: Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, Sections 261, 262, Public Law 93-415, as amended; Public Laws 95-503, 95-115, 96-509, 98-473, 100-690, and 102-586, 42 USC 5665-5665a.

OBJECTIVES: To develop and implement programs that design, test, and demonstrate effective approaches, techniques and methods for preventing and controlling juvenile delinquency, such as: community based-alternatives to institutional confinement; developing and implementing effective means of diverting juveniles from the traditional juvenile justice system; programs stressing advocacy activities aimed at improving services to youth impacted by the juvenile justice system; model programs to strengthen and maintain the family unit including self-help programs; prevention and treatment programs relating to juveniles who commit serious crimes; programs to prevent hate crimes; programs to provide aftercare and reintegration services; and programs to prevent youth gun and gang violence.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: To be eligible for a Special Emphasis Assistance Award or contract, an applicant must: (1) respond to legislative requirements contained in Section 261 (a) and (b) of the JJDP Act, as amended, as well as specific program guidelines issued by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP); (2) be consistent with the objectives and priorities of OJJDP and the State's comprehensive juvenile justice and delinquency prevention plan; (3) provide for proper program administration, evaluation, and fiscal reporting; (4) demonstrate, in the overall quality of the proposal, that the program is technically sound and will achieve the required program objectives at the highest possible level; (5) demonstrate that the proposed project meets the requirements of relative cost effectiveness pursuant to Section 262 (c)(1) and (c)(5) of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act; and (6) respond to clear and documentable needs.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Special Emphasis funds are available under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, as amended, to public and private nonprofit agencies, organizations, individuals, State and local units of government, and combinations of State or local units.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Public and private youth serving agencies/organizations, State and local units of government, combinations of such units, or other private agencies, organizations, institutions or individuals.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Administration and costs appropriateness will be determined in accordance with the provisions of OMB circulars and government-wide common rules applicable to grants and cooperative agreements, including OMB Circular Nos. A-87 for State and local governments, A-21 for educational institutions, and A-122 for nonprofit organizations.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Special Emphasis: Grants awarded under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act do not require a cash match.

 

16.542 National Institute for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

AUTHORIZATION: Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, Section 241-248, as amended; Public Law 93-415, Public Law 95-503, 95-115, 96-509, 98-473, 100-690, and 102-586, 42 USC 5651-5662.

OBJECTIVES: To encourage, coordinate, and conduct research and evaluation of juvenile justice and delinquency prevention activities; to provide for public and private agencies, institutions, justice system agencies, a clearinghouse and information center for collecting, disseminating, publishing, and distributing information on juvenile delinquency; to conduct national training programs of juvenile related issues, and provide technical assistance and training to Federal, State, and local governments, courts, corrections, law enforcement, probation, public and private agencies, institutions, and individuals, in the planning, establishment, funding, operation, or evaluation of juvenile delinquency programs.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: It is the purpose of the Institute to: (1) provide a coordinating center for the collection, preparation, and dissemination of useful data regarding the prevention, treatment, and control of juvenile delinquency and child exploitation; (2) provide training for human services professionals, judges, paraprofessionals, juvenile corrections and detention personnel, volunteers, and law enforcement personnel where activities relate to juvenile delinquency prevention and treatment programs and improvement of the juvenile justice system; (3) promote leadership development in the field of juvenile justice; (4) promote dissemination of information about new technologies and training methods; (5) stimulate and support training in the fields of juvenile justice, and the human services networks which support the juvenile justice system; and (6) support development of standards for the administration of juvenile justice. The funds are also used to: (1) conduct research, program development and evaluation into any aspect of juvenile delinquency, missing and exploited children; (2) review standards of juvenile detention and correctional facilities; (3) strengthen and maintain the family unit; (4) improve our understanding of the development of pro-social and anti-social behavior patterns; (5) report the number and characteristics of juveniles taken into custody; (6) collect, process, and report on the data from the Nation's juvenile justice systems; (7) assess the juvenile justice system's handling of sex offenders and their offenses; (8) research and identify early court interventions, delays in sanctions, and effective juvenile offender prevention and treatment programs; and (9) study waivers and transfers to adult courts and conduct research to increase knowledge of how violent youth gangs contribute to serious, violent, and chronic juvenile crime.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Public or private agencies, organizations, or individuals.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Public or private agencies, organizations, or individuals.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: No match required.

 

16.543 Missing Children's Assistance

AUTHORIZATION: Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974,Title IV, Public Law 93-415, as amended; Public Laws 98-473, 100-690, 102-586, 104-235, and 106-71; codified as amended at 42 USC 5771-5780.

OBJECTIVES: To coordinate Federal missing and exploited children activities and to support research, training, technical assistance, and demonstration programs to enhance the overall response to missing children and their families. Establish and maintain a national resource center and clearinghouse dedicated to missing and exploited children issues that: (1) provides a toll-free hotline where citizens can report investigative leads and parents and other interested individuals can receive information concerning missing children; (2) provides technical assistance to parents, law enforcement, and other professionals working on missing and exploited children cases; (3) promotes information sharing and provides technical assistance by networking with regional nonprofit organizations, State missing children clearinghouses, and law enforcement agencies; (4) develops publications that contain practical, timely information; and (5) provides information regarding programs offering free or low-cost transportation services that assist in reuniting children with their families. On a periodic basis, conduct national incidence studies to determine the type and extent of missing children in America. Support law enforcement demonstration programs (e.g., the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program) to enhance the investigative response to missing and exploited children cases. Support research to broaden understanding of a wide range of missing and exploited children issues (e.g., abduction homicide investigation solvability factors), to inform training and technical assistance efforts and to identify promising practices and programs for replication. Develop training programs for law enforcement, child protective services, medical personnel, and prosecutors to enhance coordination and effectiveness of missing and exploited children investigations and to enhance the overall system response. Identify service gaps and develop programs to meet specialized needs of parents or guardians of children who are reported missing. Provide a national central registry and toll-free hotline service to assist community organizations and law enforcement personnel to identify and return adults suffering from Alzheimer's disease who have wandered from home. Provide training, technical assistance, and publications to enhance community wide responses to wandering incidents by memory impaired adults.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: The Administrator is authorized to make grants to and enter into contracts with public agencies or private nonprofit organizations, or combinations thereof, for research, demonstration projects, or service programs designed to: (1) educate parents, children, and community agencies and organizations in ways to prevent the abductions and sexual exploitation of children; (2) provide information to assist in the locating and return of missing children; (3) aid communities in the collection of materials which would be useful to parents in assisting others in the identification of missing children; (4) increase knowledge of and develop effective treatment pertaining to the psychological consequences on both parents and children, of (a) the abduction of a child, both during the period of disappearance and after the child is recovered; and (b) the sexual exploitation of a missing child; (5) collect detailed data from selected States or localities on the actual investigative practices utilized by law enforcement agencies in missing children's cases; (6) address the particular needs of missing children by minimizing the negative impact of judicial and law enforcement procedures on children who are victims of abuse or sexual exploitation and by promoting the active participation of children and their families in cases involving abuse or sexual exploitation of children; (7) address the needs of missing children and their families following the recovery of such children; (8) reduce the likelihood that individuals under 18 years of age will be removed from the control of such individuals' legal custodians without such custodians' consent; and (9) establish or operate statewide clearinghouses to assist in recovering or locating missing children.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Missing Children's funds are available under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, as amended, to public and private nonprofit agencies, organizations, individuals, State and local units of government, combinations of State or local units.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local units of government, private nonprofit agencies, organizations, institutions or individuals.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular Nos. A-87 for State and local governments and A-122 for nonprofit organizations.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: No match required.

 

16.544 Gang-Free Schools and Communities-Community-Based Gang Intervention

AUTHORIZATION: Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, Sections 281 and 283, Public Law 93-415, as amended, and Public Laws 100-690 and 102-586; codified as amended at 42 USC 5667-5667-1b.

OBJECTIVES: To prevent and to reduce the participation of juveniles in the activities of gangs that commit crimes. Such programs and activities may include: (1) individual, peer, family, and group counseling, including provision of life skills training and preparation for living independently, which shall include cooperation with social services, welfare, and health care programs; (2) education and social services designed to address the social and developmental needs of juveniles; (3) crisis intervention and counseling to juveniles, who are particularly at risk of gang involvement, and their families; (4) the organization of the neighborhood and community groups to work closely with parents, schools, law enforcement, and other public and private agencies in the community; and (5) training and assistance to adults who have significant relationships with juveniles who are or may become members of gangs, to assist such adults in providing constructive alternatives to participating in the activities of gangs. To develop within the juvenile adjudicatory and correctional systems new and innovative means to address the problems of juveniles convicted of serious drug-related and gang-related offenses. To provide treatment to juveniles who are members of such gangs, including members who are accused of committing a serious crime and members who have been adjudicated as being delinquent. To promote the involvement of juveniles in lawful activities in geographical areas in which gangs commit crimes. To promote and support, with the cooperation of community-based organizations experienced in providing services to juveniles engaged in gang-related activities and cooperation of local law enforcement agencies, the development of policies and activities in public elementary and secondary schools which will assist such schools in maintaining a safe environment conducive to learning. To assist juveniles who are or may become members of gangs to obtain appropriate educational instruction, in or outside a regular school program, including the provision of counseling and other services to promote and support the continued participation of such juveniles in such instructional programs. To expand the availability of prevention and treatment services relating to the illegal use of controlled substances and controlled substances analogues (as defined in paragraphs (6) and (32) of section 102 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 USC 802) by juveniles, provided through State and local health and social services agencies. To provide services to prevent juveniles from coming into contact with the juvenile justice system again as a result of gang- related activity. To provide services at a special location in a school or housing project. To facilitate coordination and cooperation among: (1) local education, juvenile justice, employment, and social service agencies; and (2) community-based programs with a proven record of effectively providing intervention services to juvenile gang members for the purpose of reducing the participation of juveniles in illegal gang activities.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: To be eligible for an award or contract, an applicant must: (1) respond to legislative requirements contained in Section 281A and 282A of the JJDP Act, as amended, as well as specific program guidelines issued by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP); (2) be consistent with the objectives and priorities of OJJDP; (3) provide for adequate program administration, evaluation, and fiscal reporting; (4) demonstrate, in the overall quality of the proposal, that the program is technically sound and will achieve the required program objectives at the highest possible level; and (5) respond to clear and documentable needs.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Part D funds are available under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, as amended, to public or private nonprofit agencies, organizations, or individuals.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Public or private nonprofit agencies, organizations, or individuals.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular Nos. A-87 for State and local governments, A-21 for educational institutions, and A-122 for nonprofit organizations.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: No match required.

 

16.547 Victims of Child Abuse (Judicial Child Abuse Training, Investigation and Prosecution of Child Abuse Through the Criminal Justice System, Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), and Children's Advocacy Centers).

AUTHORIZATION: Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990, Public Law 101-647, as amended; Public Law 102-586; codified as amended at 42 USC 13001, 13021 et seq.

OBJECTIVES: To develop model technical assistance and training programs to improve the courts' handling of child abuse and neglect cases. Facilitate the adoption of laws to protect children against the potential second assault of the courtroom proceeding; to address the present situation in which many States have adopted innovative procedures that have far outpaced Federal law, leaving those children who do enter the Federal system inadequately protected; to address the inconsistency and disparity among State laws on child abuse; to train criminal justice system personnel on up-to-date, innovative techniques for investigating and prosecuting child abuse cases; and to promote a multidisciplinary approach to coordinating the investigations and prosecution of child abuse cases and, thereby, limiting the number of pre-trial interviews a child must go through as well as better assure the accuracy of each interview, and to increase the number of communities making use of a Children's Advocacy Center approach to the investigation, prosecution and treatment of child abuse cases. The National Court Appointed Special Advocate Association provides technical assistance, information and support to local CASA programs, as well as assists communities in developing new programs, and provides support to existing and developing State organizations on issues such as the development of goals and objectives, State legislation, and State standards to strengthen local programs. Assist communities in developing child-focused programs designed to improve the resources available to children and families; providing support to non-offending family members; enhance coordination among community agencies, professionals, and provide medical support to health care and mental health care professionals involved in the intervention, prevention, prosecution, and investigation systems that respond to child abuse cases. The American Prosecutors Research Institute's National Center for the Prosecution of Child Abuse (NCPCA) pursues improvement of the quality of child abuse prosecution by providing training and technical assistance in the subject area.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Funds are available specifically to achieve the objectives of the Judicial Child Abuse Training, Investigation and Prosecution of Child Abuse Through the Criminal Justice System, Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), and the Regional and Local Advocacy Centers.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are designated in the congressional appropriations process for judicial child abuse training, investigation and prosecution of child abuse through the criminal justice system, and Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA). Local nonprofit agencies/ organizations may apply to National Court Appointed Special Advocates (NCASA) for State CASA programs and to start or expand local court appointed special advocate programs. Advocacy centers or agencies/organizations interested in start-up of children's advocacy centers may apply to the National Children's Alliance (NCA) for funds awarded to them by OJJDP for this purpose.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Public or private agencies/organizations addressing child abuse problem.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Cost will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular Nos. A-87 for State and local governments, A-21 for educational institutions, and A-122 for nonprofit organizations.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Not applicable.

 

16.548 Title V Delinquency Prevention Program

AUTHORIZATION: Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, Section 505, Title V, Public Law 93-415 as amended, Public Law102-586 and 104-316; codified as amended at 42 USC 5781-5785.

OBJECTIVES: To increase the capacity of State and local governments to support the development of more effective prevention programs to improve the juvenile justice system through risk and protective factor focused programming approach.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: This program authorizes the Administrator to make grants to a State, to be transmitted through the State Advisory Group (SAG), to units of local government for delinquency prevention programming.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: All States agencies designated by the Chief Executive under Section 299 (C) of the JJDP Act are eligible to apply for Title V funds. States will invite units of local government that meet the statutorily mandated eligibility requirements to apply for funding and competitively select for funding those jurisdictions that meet the minimum selection criteria specified in the guidelines as published in the Federal Register, and other such criteria as the State shall adopt.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Youth at risk of juvenile justice involvement and their families.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Cost will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Formula based on population of youth under the maximum age of original juvenile court delinquency jurisdiction. State or units of general local government must match Title V fund with a 50 percent cash or the value of in-kind contributions.

 

16.549 Part E State Challenge Activities (Challenge Grants)

AUTHORIZATION: Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, Section 285; Public Law 93-415 as amended; Public Law 102-586, codified as amended at 42 USC 5667c.

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the Challenge Grant Program is to provide incentives for States participating in the Formula Grants Program to develop, adopt, and approve policies and programs in one or more of ten specified challenge activities to improve the State's juvenile justice system.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Funds must be used to support the ten challenge activities specified in Section 285(b)(2) of the Juvenile Justice Delinquency Program Act, as amended.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: The only eligible applicants for Part E Challenge Grants in a given fiscal year are the State agencies, designated by the Chief Executive of the State pursuant to Section 223(a)(1) of the JJDP Act, which receive OJJDP Formula Grant awards under Section 223 of the JJDP Act for the same fiscal year.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State governments participating in the OJJDP Formula Grant Program. Youth involved in the continuum of the juvenile justice system and their families.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Each State may apply for a Part E grant in an amount equal to the sum of not more than 10 percent of such State's Formula Grant allocation received, for each Challenge activity in which the State chooses to participate, not to exceed the total amount of the State's Part E allocation. No matching funds are required.

 

16.726 Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP)

AUTHORIZATION: Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, Section 288, as amended, Public Law 93-415, as amended; Public Law 102-586, and 103-322; codified as amended at 42 USC 5667e, et seq.

OBJECTIVES: To reduce juvenile delinquency and gang participation, improve academic performance, and reduce the dropout rate through the use of mentors for at-risk youth.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: JUMP provides support for one-to-one mentoring programs for at-risk youth. An "at-risk youth" is, for purposes of this program, a youth who is at risk of educational failure or dropping out of school. A "mentor" is defined as an adult, 21 years or older, who works with an at-risk youth on a one-to-one basis, establishes a supportive relationship with the youth, and provides the youth with academic assistance and exposure to new experiences which enhance the youth's ability to become a responsible citizen.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Local education agencies (LEA) or public/private nonprofit organizations. Both entities (LEA or public/private nonprofit organizations) must collaborate with the other to implement the program. Accordingly, each applicant has specified the nature of the relationship with either the school or school agency (if the applicant is a nonprofit) or with the nonprofit (if the applicant is a LEA).

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: LEA and public/private nonprofit organizations.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments, and OMB Circular No. A-110 for Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals and Other Nonprofit Organizations.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Special Emphasis Grants awarded under The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act do not require a cash match, except for construction projects, where the match is 50 percent on community-based facilities of 20 beds or less.

 

16.727 Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws Program

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriation Act of 1999, Public Law 105-277, FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law106-553 (2000).

OBJECTIVES: To support and enhance efforts by States, in cooperation with local jurisdictions, to enforce underage drinking by prohibiting the sale of alcoholic beverages, or the consumption of alcoholic beverages by minors.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: In fiscal year 2000, a total of $25 million was awarded as block and discretionary grants in the following manner: Funds were disbursed in the amount of $360,000 to each State and the District of Columbia in block grants to support and enhance efforts by States, in cooperation with local jurisdictions, to prohibit the sale of alcoholic beverages to, or consumption of alcoholic beverages by minors. Funds in the amount of $6,640,000 were disbursed to support discretionary program activities in local jurisdictions, training and technical assistance to all States and a national evaluation. To support local discretionary programming activity, funds were competitively awarded to State agencies receiving block grants. The local programs implement the comprehensive approach to curtailing access and consumption of alcoholic beverages by minors, including the enforcement of laws pertaining to underage alcohol purchase, possession, and use. Funds to support training and technical assistance and the national evaluation supplemented on-going efforts by the existing grantees. For purposes of this initiative, minors are defined as individuals under 21 years of age. These funds cannot be used to supplant existing programs and activities (supplanting means to deliberately reduce State or local funds because of the existence of Federal funds).

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: To receive a Block Grant, Governors and the Mayor of the District of Columbia designated an agency to serve as the point of contact to apply for, receive, and administer the targeted grant funds. The same designated agencies and territories may apply to receive a discretionary grant. Their applications must detail a comprehensive approach to curtailing access and consumption of alcoholic beverages by minors, including the enforcement of underage drinking laws and how that approach will be implemented by State-selected local communities. States are encouraged to link with ongoing public and private efforts (including those of foundations and national organizations). Training and technical assistance and national evaluation funds were made available through a separate application process.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: States, territories, the District of Columbia, and Native American/Alaskan Native communities are eligible to apply for discretionary funds through a separate application process.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Each applicant applying for funds must submit a completed application, including signed assurances that it will comply with administrative requirements. In fiscal year 2000, discretionary funds were awarded to 11 States (CT, HI, KS, ME, MD, MN, MT, NV, OK, PA, WI) and 1 territory, Puerto Rico. Each State selected a minimum of two local jurisdictions in which to implement this initiative.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: In fiscal year 2000, a total of $25 million was appropriated and allocated, as in fiscal year 1999, to continue supporting the Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws Program. These funds will be disbursed through assistance awards of $360,000 to each State and the District of Columbia; discretionary funds in the amount of $6,640,000.

 

16.728 Drug Prevention Program

AUTHORIZATION: Public Law 105-119, FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law 106-553 (2000).

OBJECTIVES: To reduce drug use by encouraging the promotion of multiple approaches including the replication of the Life Skills Training (drug prevention) program, to educating and motivating young adolescents to pursue healthy lifestyles and fostering interpersonal and decision making skills, which will help them choose alternatives to high risk behaviors.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: To be eligible for a discretionary award, an applicant must respond to specific program guidelines issued by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency; provide for proper program administration, evaluation, and fiscal reporting, demonstrate, in the overall quality of the proposal, that the program is technically sound and will achieve the required program objectives at the highest possible level; demonstrate that the proposed project meets the requirements of relative cost effectiveness; and respond to clear and documentable needs.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Public and private agencies/organizations, all States and territories, and local units of government are eligible to receive funds.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Public and private agencies/organizations, all States and territories, and local units of government are eligible to receive funds.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular Nos. A-87 for State and local governments, A-21 for educational institutions, and A-122 for nonprofit organizations.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: No match required.

 

16.729 Drug-Free Communities Support Program Grants

AUTHORIZATION: Drug-Free Communities Act of 1997, Public Law 105-20 (1997), codified at 21 USC 1521 et seq.; Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, 42 USC 5651 et seq.

OBJECTIVES: To increase the capacity of community coalitions to reduce substance abuse among youth, and over time, to reduce substance abuse among adults through strengthening collaboration among communities, public, and private entities. To disseminate state-of-the-art information on practices and initiatives that have proven to be effective in reducing substance abuse among youth.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: This program, established by the Drug-Free Communities Act of 1997, awards grants to community coalitions for amounts up to $100,000 through a competitive grant award process. The focus of the program is on community coalitions that have been in existence for a minimum of 6 months, coalitions that have 5-year strategic plans aimed at reducing substance abuse among youth, and over time, among adults, and coalitions that have provided an equal match for the funds that they seek. These community coalitions are to collaborate with entities in the community including government agencies to coordinate and strengthen efforts to reduce substance abuse. The program aims to disseminate timely state-of-the-art information on practices and initiatives that have proven to be effective in reducing substance abuse.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Community coalitions must demonstrate that the community coalition has worked together for a period of not less than 6 months on substance abuse reduction initiatives. The coalition must: meet the composition requirements; ensure that there is substantial community volunteer effort; ensure that the coalition is a nonprofit, charitable, educational organization, or unit of local government, or is affiliated with an eligible organization or entity; possess a strategy to be self-sustaining; provide a 100 percent cash or in-kind match; and agree to participate in an evaluation of the coalition's program.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Community coalitions, children, youth, and adults, those at-risk of substance abuse, and private nonprofit, and public community agencies.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular Nos. A-87 for State and local governments, A-21 for educational institutions, and A-122 for nonprofit organizations.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Drug-Free Communities Support Program grants awarded under the Drug-Free Communities Act require a 100 percent cash or in-kind match.

 

16.730 Reduction and Prevention of Children's Exposure to Violence (Safe Start)

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriation Act of 1999, Public Law 105-277, FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law 106-553 (2000).

OBJECTIVES: To develop a demonstration initiative to prevent and reduce the impact of family and community violence on young children (primarily from birth to six years of age) by helping communities to expand existing partnerships between service providers (such as law enforcement, mental health, health, early childhood education and others) to create a comprehensive service delivery system.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Applicant selected to receive Safe Start cooperative agreements may use funds to establish and enhance a broad range of local prevention, intervention and treatment services for young children who have been exposed and are at risk of being exposed to violence; develop effective multi-agency protocols; coordinate services to develop a communitywide system for responding to the needs of children exposed or at risk of exposure to violence.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: To be eligible for a Safe Start cooperative agreement, an applicant must be a public agency applying on behalf of a collaborative group of agencies working to prevent and address the impact of exposure to violence on children. Private agencies and organizations may apply as co-applicants as long as the lead applicant is a public agency.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants for the Safe Start Demonstration Project are communities that have formed a strong collaborative group (or shown the ability and commitment to expand coordination with key partners such as courts, law enforcement, early childhood development and domestic violence agencies, and mental health services) to prevent and address the impact that exposure to violence has on young children. Only public agencies (including State agencies, units of local government, and tribal governments) may apply as lead applicants. Applicants for the evaluation are public and private agencies (private, for-profit organizations must agree to waive any profit or fee), organizations, institutions, or individuals that have demonstrated experience in evaluating broad-based community initiatives and whose experience includes the design of studies capable of analyzing process and measuring impact across multiple communities and the development and delivery of evaluation-based training and technical assistance.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments, Circular No. A-21 for educational institutions, and Circular No. A-122 for nonprofit organizations.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Special Emphasis: Grants awarded under the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act do not require a cash match; except for construction projects, where the match is 50 percent on community based facilities of 20 beds or less.

 

16.731 Tribal Youth Program

AUTHORIZATION: Appropriations for the Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies, FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law 106-553 (2000).

OBJECTIVES: To support and enhance tribal efforts for comprehensive delinquency prevention, control, and juvenile justice system improvement for Native American youth.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: To reduce, control, and prevent crime both by and against tribal youth; to provide interventions for court- involved tribal youth; to improve tribal juvenile justice systems; and to provide prevention programs focusing on alcohol and drugs.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Applications are only invited from Federally recognized tribes and Alaskan Native villages; however, tribes and villages may partner with others as applicable. If partnering with others, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) should be submitted with the application. Additionally, one tribe should be chosen as the primary agency for funding and reporting purposes.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: All Federally recognized tribes and Alaskan Native villages.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Each applicant must submit a completed application, including signed assurances that it will comply with statutory and administrative requirements.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Not applicable.

 

16.732 National Evaluation of the Safe Schools-Healthy Student Initiative

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriation Act of 1999, Public Law 105-277, FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law 106-553 (2000).

OBJECTIVES: To conduct an evaluation of the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Applicant selected to receive cooperative agreement for national evaluation of the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative must use the funds to evaluate the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Applicants are invited from public and private agencies, organizations, institutions, or individuals. Applicants must demonstrate that they have experience in evaluating broad-based community initiatives. Private, for-profit organizations must agree to waive any profit or fee. Joint applications from two or more eligible applicants are welcome, as long as one is designated the primary applicant for purposes of correspondence, awards, and management and any others as co-applicants.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Public or private agencies, organizations, or individuals.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: None.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Grants awarded under the JJDP Act do not require a cash match; except for construction projects, where the match is 50 percent on community-based facilities of 20 beds or less.



BUREAU OF JUSTICE STATISTICS

 

16.550 State Justice Statistics Program for Statistical Analysis Centers (SAC)

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Section 301, Public law 90-351, §301, et seq., as amended, Public Laws 96-157, 98-473, 100-690, and 103-322; codified as amended at 42 USC 3731-3735.

OBJECTIVES: To provide financial and technical assistance to State governments for the establishment and operation of SAC to collect, analyze, and disseminate justice statistics.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: To improve the administration of justice by encouraging the development of State-level capabilities for collecting, analyzing, utilizing, and disseminating statistical information pertaining to crime, criminal justice, sex offenses, incident based reporting, and for providing statistical information to the Federal Government for national compilations. To analyze particular criminal justice issues of current concern and significance to criminal justice practitioners, as identified by BJS in conjunction with other Office of Justice Programs components, the Justice Research and Statistics Association, and selected SAC Directors. Further information is available in the "State Justice Statistics Program for Statistical Analysis Centers: Program Application Guidelines, FY 2001" expected for release by April 2001.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: The Bureau of Justice Statistics is authorized to award grants and cooperative agreements to State agencies authorized by State legislation or executive order and designated with responsibility for the particular programs.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Eligible beneficiaries are State agencies whose responsibilities include statistical activities consistent with the goals of the specific programs.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must furnish, along with the application for an award, details of the program budget composition, goals, impact, methods, evaluation plan, and resources of the project. Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular Nos.A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: There is no statutory requirement for matching funds. For most programs, however, provision of cash or in-kind match by the recipient is encouraged.

 

16.554 National Criminal History Improvement Program (NCHIP)

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Section 509, Public Law 90-351, codified as amended at 42 USC 3759; Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, Section 106(b), Public Law 103-159, codified as amended at 4218 USC 921 et seq; Crime Identification Technology Act of 1998, Public Law 105-251; codified as amended at 42 USC§14601 National Child Protection Act of 1993, Section 4(b), Public Law 103-209, codified as amended at 42 USC 5119 et seq; Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, Public Law 103-322; codified as amended 42 USC 13701 et seq.

OBJECTIVES: To enhance the quality and completeness of the nation's criminal history record systems; to provide financial and technical assistance to States for the establishment or improvement of computerized criminal history record systems and in their efforts to collect data on stalking and domestic violence; to improve data accessibility and support data transmissions to the national system which will permit the immediate identification of persons who are prohibited from purchasing firearms, are subject to domestic violence protective orders, or are ineligible to hold positions of responsibility involving children, the elderly, or the disabled; to support the development of accurate and complete State sex offender identification and registration systems which interface with the FBI's Sex Offender Registry and meet applicable Federal and State requirements; to develop and improve the processes for identifying, classifying, collecting, and entering data regarding stalking and domestic violence into local, State, and national crime information databases; to ensure that criminal justice systems are designed, implemented or upgraded to be compliant where applicable, with the FBI operated National Instant Criminal Background Check System and Interstate Automated Fingerprint Identification System, meet other applicable statewide or regional criminal justice information sharing standards and plans; and, build upon ongoing efforts so as to support the wide range of technology based, criminal justice information, identification, and communications needs identified by the States.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Allowable uses of funds are outlined in the NCHIP fiscal year 2001 Program Announcement released in March/April 2001. Allowable costs include costs associated with participation in the Interstate Identification Index (III), the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS), and the National Sex Offender Registry (NSOR), database automation and record improvements, record flagging, AFIS/live scan, interface with systems compatible with the National Incident-Based Reporting System, relevant equipment, training, and research.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Awards will be made to the agency designated by the Governor to administer the NCHIP program. An award will be made to each eligible applicant State. The designated agency may be the agency with primary responsibility for implementing the major activity to be funded with NCHIP funds or a parent agency with programmatic oversight over, and legislative authority to transfer funds to, such agency.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Funds awarded to the State may be allocated for use in State or local agencies or the courts. Private organizations may receive funds under contract arrangements with a governmental unit to which NCHIP funds are allocated by the State.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must furnish, along with the application for an award, a detailed budget, a budget narrative, and a program narrative including the accomplishments, goals, impact, methods, evaluation plan, and resources of the project.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Provisions of a 10 percent cash or in-kind match by the recipient is required.

 

16.733 National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS)

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Public Law 105-251, 42 USC 37601; Crime Identification Technology Act of 1998.

OBJECTIVES: To allow State and local jurisdictions to capture detailed offense, offender, victim, property, and arrest information. NIBRS moves beyond aggregate statistics and raw counts of crimes and arrests that comprise the summary UCR program to individual records for each reported crime incident and its associated arrest.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: To provide funding to jurisdictions for implementing the NIBRS. The NIBRS grants will be awarded to selected jurisdictions to develop or enhance records management systems that are NIBRS-compatible.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: NIBRS awards are made to States applying on behalf of one or more cities or counties in the State, regardless of whether the State maintains a UCR program. Because of limited funding, not every state will receive an award, and the grants may not cover the entire costs of the conversion to NIBRS.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Eligible beneficiaries are jurisdictions who are responsible for implementing the NIBRS.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must furnish, along with the application for an award, a detailed budget, a budget narrative, and a program narrative including the goals, impact, methods, evaluation plan, and resources of the project.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: The Crime Identification Technology Act requires that fund recipients provide a 10 percent match of total project costs.



NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF JUSTICE

 

16.560 Justice Research, Evaluation, and Development Project Grants

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Sections 201-203, Public Law 90-351 as amended; Public Laws 96-157, 98-473, 100-690, 103-322, and 104-316; codified as amended at 42 USC 3721-3723.

OBJECTIVES: To encourage and support research, development, and evaluation to further understanding of the causes and correlates of crime and violence, methods of crime prevention and control, and criminal justice system responses to crime and violence and contribute to the improvement of the criminal justice system and its responses to crime, violence and delinquency.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: The funds may be used to conduct research and development pertaining to the above objectives, including the development of new or improved approaches, techniques, systems, and technologies and to carry out programs of research on the causes of crime and means of preventing crime, and to evaluate criminal justice programs and procedures, and responses to crime, violence and delinquency.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is authorized to make grants to, or enter into contracts or cooperative agreements with State and local governments, private nonprofit organizations, public nonprofit organizations, profit organizations, nonprofit organizations, institutions of higher education, and qualified individuals. Applicants from the Territories of the United States and federally recognized Indian Tribal Governments are also eligible to participate in this program.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local governments, private nonprofit organizations, public nonprofit organizations, profit organizations, nonprofit organizations, institutions of higher education, and qualified individuals.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must furnish, along with the application for a grant, cooperative agreement or contract, resumes of principal investigator and key personnel, details of the budget composition, goals, impacts, methods, evaluation, schedule and resources of the project. Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments and OMB Circular No. A-21 for educational institutions.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: This program has no statutory formula requirement. However, the Institute shall require, whenever feasible, as a condition of approval of a grant or contract that the recipient contribute money, facilities, or services to carry out the purpose for which the grant is sought.

 

16.561 National Institute of Justice Visiting Fellowships

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Sections 201-202, Public Law 90-351 as amended; Public Laws 96-157, 98-473, 100-690, 103-322, and 104-316; codified as amended at 42 USC 3721-3722.

OBJECTIVES: To provide opportunities for experienced criminal justice practitioners and researchers to pursue projects aimed at improved understanding of crime, delinquency and criminal justice administration by sponsoring research projects of their own creation and design.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: The funds may be used to conduct research for both adult and juvenile systems on crime causation, crime measurements, crime prevention, law enforcement, criminal justice administration, and the effectiveness and efficiency of anti-crime programs. Fellows conduct their studies while based at the National Institute of Justice.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Fellowship grants are awarded to individuals or to their parent agencies or organizations. IPA appointments also may be negotiated with Fellows' parent agencies. Generally, professionals working in the criminal justice field, including university or college-based academic researchers and upper-level managers in criminal justice agencies are eligible.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Generally, professionals working in the field of criminal justice research are eligible for grants; those working for law enforcement related branches of State or local government units are eligible for grants or IPA appointments. Each prospective candidate must have at least a bachelor's degree.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must furnish, along with the application for a grant, a resume, a project description which includes the project's scope, a discussion of the methodology, project period, and the anticipated impact of the study on the justice system. Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: This program has no formula or matching requirements.

 

16.562 Criminal Justice Research and Development-Graduate Research Fellowship Program

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Sections 201-202, Public Law 90-351 as amended; Public Laws 96-157, 98-473, 100-690, 103-322, and 104-316; codified as amended at 42 USC 3721-3722.

OBJECTIVES: To improve the quality and quantity of knowledge about crime and the criminal justice system, while, at the same time, helping to increase the number of persons who are qualified to teach in collegiate criminal justice programs, to conduct research related to criminal justice issues, and to perform more effectively within the criminal justice system.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Eligible students are doctoral candidates engaged in dissertation research and writing on a problem related to law enforcement, crime or criminal justice. A fellowship is funded for up to 18 months. This competitive program provides fellowship stipends, major project costs, and certain university fees for a maximum amount of $15,000. Students who do not qualify for the doctoral program may consider applying for other research grants under the fellowship solicitation.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Accredited institution of higher education offering a doctoral degree program. Degree does not have to be in criminal justice, but proposed dissertation work must be related to criminal justice issues.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: The student must be engaged in writing a doctoral dissertation directly relevant to crime, law enforcement and/or criminal justice.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Eligible graduate students interested in competing for a fellowship must furnish, along with the application for a grant, a letter of endorsement from the faculty advisor. Applicants must have completed all degree requirements except the research writing, and defense of the dissertation or an internship prior to the start of the grant. This program is excluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-87.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: This program has no matching requirements.

 

16.563 Corrections and Law Enforcement Family Support

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994,Title XXI, Subtitle B, Section 210201, Public Law 103-322; codified as amended at 42 USC 3796jj, et seq.

OBJECTIVES: To research the effects of stress on law enforcement and correctional personnel and their families and disseminate the findings; identify and evaluate model programs that provide support services to law enforcement correctional personnel and families; provide technical assistance and training programs to develop stress-reduction and family support programs to State and local law enforcement and correctional agencies; collect and disseminate information regarding family support, stress-reduction, and psychological services to State and local law enforcement and correctional organizations and other interested parties; determine issues to be researched by the Department of Justice and grant recipients.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Corrections and Law Enforcement Family Support funds may be used by State or local law enforcement agencies or corrections agencies and/or police or corrections unions to demonstrate innovative techniques for, to provide training on, or to conduct research on reducing stress in law enforcement or correction organizations or experienced by law enforcement or correctional officers and\or their families.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: State and local law enforcement or correction agencies and organizations representing State or local law enforcement or correctional personnel including National, State, or local labor unions or associations representing commissioned State or local law enforcement correctional officers in contract negotiations or other employment matters in one or more law enforcement or corrections agencies may submit proposals. Other organizations such as universities, colleges, independent research enterprises, professional associations, hospitals, health care clinics, and counseling or other treatment service providers among others, while not eligible to submit proposals, may provide technical assistance in either a consulting or sub-contracting capacity to the applicant.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local law enforcement and corrections agencies and organizations representing State or local law enforcement or correctional personnel including National, State, or local labor unions or associations representing commissioned State or local law enforcement or correctional officers in contract negotiations or other employment matters in one or more law enforcement agencies may submit proposals. Other organizations such as universities, colleges, independent research enterprises, professional associations, hospitals, health care clinics, and counseling or other treatment service providers among others, while not eligible to submit proposals, may provide technical assistance in either a consulting or sub-contracting capacity to the applicant.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must submit a completed Application for Federal Assistance (Standard Form 424), including signed assurances that the applicant will comply with statutory and administrative requirements. The applicant is also required to submit a proposal describing the program for which funds are sought and explaining how the program will advance knowledge and/or the state of the art of practice in reducing stress for law enforcement officers and their families.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Law enforcement and correctional agencies are required to match all Federal funds with an equal amount of cash or in-kind goods or services from non-federal sources.

 

16.564 Crime Laboratory Improvement-Combined Offender DNA Index System Backlog Reduction

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Section 201, as amended; Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, Public law 100-690; DNA Identification Act of 1994, Section 2401, Public Law 103-322, FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law 106-553.

OBJECTIVES: To increase the capabilities and capacity of State and local crime laboratories in the United States to conduct state-of- the-art forensic evidence testing and to reduce the backlog of convicted offender DNA samples.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: The Federal share of grants made under this program shall not exceed 75 percent of the total cost of the project described in the application. Furthermore, grant funds shall not be used to pay for State or local personnel costs. Project proposals shall demonstrate that the Federal share will be spent on expenses directly associated with the start-up or expansion of a public crime laboratory facility. Indirect and administrative costs are unallowable under this program. The Federal share shall not be used for new construction of laboratory buildings or facilities or to make modifications to existing laboratory space that are not necessary to house or operate required equipment. Federal funds shall not be used to replace funds already available for supplies to support forensic casework operations or the typing of convicted offender samples. Additionally, the Federal share shall not be used for travel-related or registration expenses for professional meetings and conferences. Expenditures from the Federal share may include the following: Laboratory equipment and supplies and other expenses directly attributable to conducting forensic analysis; outside training and related travel expenses for applicable graduate-level course work or training courses in specific methodologies as recommended by the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for DNA Quality Control/Quality Assurance; modifications to existing laboratory space only where necessary to accommodate required laboratory equipment and activities related to forensic analysis; contractor- provided services to conduct forensic testing of evidence; Combined Offender DNA Index System (CODIS) equipment and testing. Details regarding this program may be obtained by contacting the Department of Justice Response Center at 1-(800)-421-6770 or accessing the web site at www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij under Funding Opportunities.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: In accordance with the DNA Identification Act of 1994; Public Law 103-322, eligible applicants must be State or local (i.e., county and municipal) governments or combinations thereof. States with more than one current or prospective crime laboratory must work together to develop statewide testing programs and must demonstrate this coordination in the proposal. Such States should consider submitting a consortium proposal covering all affected laboratories. Local or regional crime laboratories may submit grant applications in conjunction with their State or they may submit on their own if coordination and participation with the State effort is clearly demonstrated and the need for forensic testing capabilities in the applicant's crime laboratory is justified. Applicants must certify that forensic analyses performed at the laboratory will satisfy or exceed the current standards for a Quality Assurance Program for DNA analysis issued by the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation under Section 14131 of Title 42 United States Code, as required by the DNA Identification Act of 1994, Public Law 103-322, as well as striving for ASCLD accreditation in other forensic disciplines.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: In accordance with the DNA Identification Act of 1994; Public Law 103-322, eligible applicants must be State or local (i.e., county and municipal) governments or combinations thereof. The purpose of this solicitation is to request applications for grants from State and local (i.e., county and municipal) governments to develop or improve the capability to analyze forensic evidence in State and local forensic laboratories.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must furnish, along with the application for a grant, the "Statutory Assurance" required by the DNA Identification Act of 1994, certification that Federal funds will not be used to supplant State or local funds, a proposal abstract, program narrative, project period, forensic testing capacity requirements and estimates, and resumes of key personnel. Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: The Federal share of grants made under this program shall not exceed 75 percent of the total cost of the project described in the application. Furthermore, grant funds shall not be used to pay for State or local personnel costs. Applicants, however, may include the cost of laboratory personnel directly associated with the project as a credit toward the 25 percent minimum State or local match requirement. Please note that the minimum match requirement is 25 percent of total projects costs, not 25 percent of the Federal share.

 

16.565 National Institute of Justice Domestic Anti-Terrorism Technology Development Program

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Section 201, as amended; Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, Public Law 100-690. Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, Public Law 104-132, Section 821. OBJECTIVE: To support the development of counter terrorism technologies, assist in the development of standards for those technologies, and work with state and local jurisdictions to identify particular areas of vulnerability to terrorist acts and be better prepared to respond if such acts occur.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: NIJ sponsors solicitations for the development of counter terrorism technologies for State and local law enforcement through its collaborations with various technology partners. Applicants may obtain information about solicitation opportunities, deadlines, and projects currently being funded through accessing the Institute's Justice Technology Information Network (JUSTNET) web site at http://www.nlectc.org or by calling Wendy Howe in the Institute's Office of Science and Technology at (202) 616-9794.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is authorized to make grants to, or enter into contracts or cooperative agreements with State and local governments, private nonprofit organizations, public nonprofit organizations, profit organizations, nonprofit organizations, institutions of higher education, and qualified individuals. Applicants from the Territories of the United States and federally recognized Indian Tribal Governments are also eligible to participate in this program.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local governments, private nonprofit organizations, public nonprofit organizations, profit organizations, nonprofit organizations, institutions of higher education, and qualified individuals.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must furnish, along with the application for a grant, cooperative agreement or contract, resumes of principal investigator and key personnel, details of the budget composition, goals, impact, methods, evaluation, schedule and resources of the project. Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments and OMB Circular No. A-21 for educational institutions.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: There are no matching requirements.



BUREAU OF JUSTICE ASSISTANCE

 

16.571 Public Safety Officers' Benefits Program

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, as amended, 42 USC 3796.

OBJECTIVES: To provide a $151,635 death benefit to the eligible survivors of Federal, State or local public safety officers whose death is the direct and proximate result of a personal (traumatic) injury sustained in the line of duty. Beginning on October 1, 1988, and on each October 1st thereafter, the benefit is adjusted by the percentage of change in the Consumer Price Index during the previous year. Effective November 29, 1990, the Act also provides the same benefit to a public safety officer who has been permanently and totally disabled as the direct result of a catastrophic personal injury sustained in the line of duty. The injury must permanently prevent the officer from performing any gainful work.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: To provide a $151,635 death benefit to the eligible survivors of Federal, State or local public safety officers, or a $151,635 disability benefit to the Federal, State or local public safety officer, whose permanent and total disability is the direct and proximate result of a catastrophic personal injury sustained in the line of duty. There are no restrictions as to how the monies are spent once they reach the recipient with the exception that monies paid on behalf of minor children must be used for their care and benefit.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: None.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Public safety officers-A public safety officer is a person serving a public agency in an official capacity, with or without compensation, as a law enforcement officer, firefighter or member of a public rescue squad or ambulance crew. Law enforcement officers include but are not limited to police, corrections, probation, parole and judicial officers. Volunteer firefighters and members of volunteer rescue squads and ambulance crews are covered if they are officially recognized or designated members of legally organized volunteer fire, rescue or ambulance departments. Disabled public safety officers and eligible survivors of deceased public safety officers in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, Virgin Islands, American Samoa, the Pacific Trust Territories and the Northern Mariana Islands are also entitled to benefits under the Act. Death benefit coverage for: (1) State and local law enforcement officers and firefighters applies to deaths occurring on or after September 29, 1976; (2) Federal law enforcement officers and firefighters applies to deaths occurring on or after October 12, 1984; and (3) Federal, State and local rescue squad and ambulance crew members applies to death occurring on or after October 15, 1986. Disability benefit coverage for Federal, State and local law enforcement officers, firefighters and members of public rescue squads and ambulance crews applies to injuries sustained on or after November 29, 1990.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: The spouse and children of the public safety officer are eligible survivors. The parents of the public safety officer become eligible if the public safety officer is not survived by a spouse or children. Children include any natural, out of wedlock, adopted or posthumous child, or stepchild who is 18 years old or younger. Children over 18 may be eligible if they are full-time students or incapable of self-support.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Claim forms entitled "Claim for Death Benefits" and "Report of Public Safety Officers' Death" or "Report of Public Safety Officer's Permanent and Total Disability," and supporting family, medical and investigative documentation. This program is excluded from coverage under OMB Circular No. A-87.

 

16.577 Emergency Federal Law Enforcement Assistance

AUTHORIZATION: Justice Assistance Act of 1984,Title II, Chapter VI, Public Law 98-473, 98 Stat. 1837, Section 609, October 12, 1984.

OBJECTIVES: To provide necessary assistance to a State government in order to provide an adequate response to an uncommon situation which requires law enforcement, which is or threatens to become of serious or epidemic proportions, and with respect to which State and local resources are inadequate to protect the lives and property of citizens, or to enforce the criminal law.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Funds are made available to assist State and/or local units of government which are experiencing law enforcement emergencies, to respond to those emergencies through the provision of Federal law enforcement assistance.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: All States and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and the Northern Mariana Islands.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: States (on behalf of itself or a local unit of government).

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: None.

 

16.578 Federal Surplus Property Transfer Program

AUTHORIZATION: The 1998 Justice Appropriations Act, Pub. L. 105-119, 111 Stat. 2440 (1997), 40 USC §494 (p) (1) (A), (B) (I) (i).

OBJECTIVES: To transfer or convey to State and local governments and territories, at no cost, surplus real and related personal property determined by the Attorney General to be required for correctional facility or law enforcement use for programs or projects for the care or rehabilitation of criminal offenders, as approved by the Attorney General. Law enforcement knowledge, skills, and abilities will be enhanced to address law enforcement needs within the jurisdiction.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Assistance is strictly for correctional and law enforcement purposes only.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Virgin Islands, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or any political subdivision or instrumentality, thereof.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State, local and territorial governments that care for or rehabilitate criminal offenders.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: None.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: None.

 

16.579 Byrne Formula Grant Program

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Public law 90-351, §501 et seq., codified as amended at 42 USC 3750 et seq.

OBJECTIVES: To reduce and prevent illegal drug activity, crime, and violence and to improve the functioning of the criminal justice system.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Funds may be used to provide additional personnel, equipment, facilities (including upgraded and additional Law Enforcement Crime Laboratories), personnel training and equipment for more widespread apprehension, prosecution and adjudication of persons who violate State and local laws relating to the production, possession and transfer of Controlled Substances and to improve the Criminal Justice System. Outlined in the Act are other specific purposes for which funds can be used. The Act restricts the use of these funds for supplanting State and local funds and land acquisition, and construction other than penal or correctional facilities.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: All States, the District of Columbia, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealths of Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands and Northern Mariana Islands.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and units of local governments.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Each participant State will receive a base amount of $500,000 or .25 percent of the amount available for the program, whichever is greater, with the remaining funds allocated to each State on the basis of the State's relative share of total U.S. population. If a State elects not to participate, all funds may be awarded directly to local units of government and combinations of units of local governments within the State. (a) Funds from the Act may be used to pay up to 75 percent of the cost of a program or project. The remaining non-federal share will be provided in cash. Match for the formula grant programs will be provided for on a project-by-project basis, state-wide basis, unit-of-government basis, or a combination of the above. Requests will be contained in the application. (b) Funds distributed to an Indian tribe which performs law enforcement functions (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior) for any program or project described in the Act shall be 100 percent of such costs.

 

16.580 Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Discretionary Grants Program (Discretionary Drug and Criminal Justice Assistance Program)

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Public Law 90-351, as amended, Title I; codified as amended at 42 USC 3760-3766b.

OBJECTIVES: To provide leadership and direction in controlling the use and availability of illegal drugs and to improve the functioning of the criminal justice system, with emphasis on violent crime and serious offenders. Programs for FY 2000 demonstrate innovative, comprehensive, and integrated multi-agency approaches to violent crime control and community mobilization programs.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Discretionary Grant funds provide Federal financial assistance to public or private agencies and private nonprofit organizations for the purposes of undertaking education and training programs for criminal justice personnel; providing technical assistance to State and local units of government; undertaking projects that are national or multi-jurisdictional in scope and that address the purpose areas authorized by the Act; and providing financial assistance to public agencies and private nonprofit organizations for demonstration programs that in view of previous research or experience, are likely to be a success in more that one jurisdiction. The Act prohibits the use of these funds for supplanting of State and local funds, land acquisition or construction projects.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: State and local government agencies as well as public and private nonprofit organizations and federally recognized Indian Tribal governments are eligible to apply for and receive funds under this program.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local governments, public and private organizations and Indian Tribal governments.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Grants may be made for amounts up to 100 percent of the costs of the programs or projects contained in the approved applications.

 

16.592 Local Law Enforcement Block Grants Program

AUTHORIZATION: FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law 106-553.

OBJECTIVES: To provide funds to units of local government for the purposes of reducing crime and improving public safety. Funds may be used for one or more of seven program purpose areas. (See Uses and Use Restrictions). Funds or a portion of funds allocated under this title may also be used to contract with private, nonprofit entities or community-based organizations to carry out the purposes of this Block Grants Program. BJA will also make awards to States based on the allocation formula specified in the legislation.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Funds may be used for one or more of the following purpose areas: (1) law enforcement support for hiring, training, and employing on a continuing basis new, additional law enforcement officers and necessary support personnel; paying overtime to presently employed law enforcement officers and necessary support personnel; and procuring equipment, technology, and other material directly related to basic law enforcement functions; (2) enhancing security measures in and around schools, and in and around any other facility or location that the unit of local government considers a special risk for incidents of crime; (3) establishing or supporting drug courts; (4) enhancing the adjudication of cases involving violent offenders, including cases involving violent juvenile offenders. For the purposes of this program, violent offender means a person charged with committing a Part I violent crime under the Uniform Crime Reports; (5) establishing a multi-jurisdictional task force, particularly in rural areas, composed of law enforcement officials representing units of local government; this task force will work with Federal law enforcement officials to prevent and control crime; (6) establishing crime prevention programs involving cooperation between community residents and law enforcement personnel to control, detect, or investigate crime or the prosecution of criminals; and (7) defraying the cost of indemnification insurance for law enforcement officers. Units of local government may not expend funds provided under the Block Grants Program to purchase, lease, rent, or acquire any of the following: tanks or armored vehicles; fixed-wing aircraft; limousines; real estate; yachts; consultants; and vehicles not primarily used for law enforcement. In addition, Federal funds cannot be used to supplant State or local funds, but instead to increase the amount of funds that would be available otherwise from State and local sources.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Funding under this program is available to units of local government within a State. A unit of local government is a town or township, village, city, or county or recognized governing body of an Indian tribe or Alaskan Native village that carries out substantial governmental duties and powers. Each unit of local government must report Uniform Crime Report (UCR) data so as to determine amounts of allocation. These data must reflect Part I violent crimes, which are murder, aggravated assault, rape, and robbery, that have been committed in each eligible jurisdiction. Data reported and vetted by the FBI for the three previous years will be averaged and used to compute allocations. The amount of the award is proportionate to each local jurisdiction's average annual amount of Part I violent crimes compared to that for all other local jurisdictions in the State. Further, for the purposes of this Block Grants Program the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico shall be considered a unit of local government as well as a State. In addition, each State will receive a minimum award of 0.25 percent of the total amount available for formula distribution under the Block Grants Program.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: States, units of local government, and U.S. Territories.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Applications for funding under the Block Grants Program must also be submitted to the State Administrative Agency and the State Single Point of Contact for review and comment at the time of application submission to BJA. Each State and unit of local government applicant, by completing the grant application, and by accepting a Block Grants award, agrees to certify: (1) that a trust fund to deposit all Federal payments received under the Block Grants Program has been established; (2) that prior to the obligation of any funds received under the Block Grants Program, an advisory board that includes representatives of groups with recognized interest in criminal justice and crime or substance abuse prevention and treatment has been formed. The advisory board must review the application for funding under the Block Grants Program and it must be authorized to make non-binding recommendations to the unit of local government for the use of funds received under this program; (3) that at least one public hearing has been held regarding the proposed use of Block Grants funds prior to the obligation of any funds received; (4) that the funds required to pay the nonfederal portion of the cost of each program will be made available for expenditure during the grant period. This certification is made by including the total match amount on the application form and providing a certification; (5) that Block Grant funds and any interest deriving therefrom within 24 months of the date of the initial payment are obligated and expended. Any funds and interest that remain unobligated and unexpended at the end of the 24 months from the date of initial payment shall be returned to BJA within 27 months of the initial payment; (6) that they will comply with nondiscrimination requirements contained in various Federal laws. If funded, grantees must acknowledge that failure to submit an acceptable Equal Employment Opportunity Plan approved by the Office for Civil Rights is a violation of its certified assurances and may result in the suspension of funding obligation authority; (7) that persons employed by the recipient are eligible to work in the United States; (8) that funds awarded will not be used to supplant State and/or local funds that would otherwise be available for crime prevention and public safety; (9) that they will provide such accounting, auditing, monitoring and evaluation procedures as may be necessary, and keep such records as the Office of Justice Programs may prescribe, to assure fiscal control, proper management and efficient disbursement of Federal funds; (10) that priority will be given to members of the Armed Forces who were separated or retired involuntarily due to the reductions in the Department of Defense in the employment of persons as additional law enforcement officers or support personnel; (11) that they have a law in place which ensures that public safety officers who retire due to a disability sustained in the line of duty receive the same or better health insurance benefits as such officers received while on active duty. Failure to provide such health benefits will result in the jurisdiction forfeiting 10 percent of their award; (12) that they will submit financial and progress reports concerning the activities carried out with the Federal funds received and will maintain and report such data and information as required; (13) that they will adhere to the audit and financial management requirements set forth in the Single Audit Act of 1984 and OMB Circular No.A-128, "Audits of State and Local Governments;" (14) that the information in the application is correct and that they will comply with all applicable provisions of the Omnibus Fiscal Year 1996 Appropriations Act and other Federal laws, regulations, and circulars. Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No. A-87 for State and local governments; and (15) that they will comply with requirements under 28 CFR Part 69,¡§New Restrictions on Lobbying," and 28 CFR Part 67,¡§Government-Wide Debarment and Suspension (Nonprocurement) and Government-Wide Requirements for Drug-Free Workplace (Grants)."

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: The Federal funds provided under a grant for the Block Grants Program may not exceed 90 percent of the total costs of a program. The applicant's matching share must be in the form of cash. The amount of the required match can be computed by calculating one-ninth of the Federal portion of program costs. For example, if $90,000 of Federal funds is requested, this amount multiplied by 1/9th requires a local entity to match it with $10,000. The Federal amount ($90,000) plus the match ($10,000) should be combined to equal the total program proposal cost. The matching requirement is only applicable to the amount of the Federal award, not any interest or income derived therefrom. The applicant must certify as part of its application that the funds required to pay the non-federal portion of the cost of each program will be made available for expenditure during the grant period. This certification is made by including the total match amount on the application form and signing the certified assurances document. Regardless of the source of match, it must be expended during the period of the Block Grant. All grantees must maintain records that clearly show the source, the amount, and the timing of all matching contributions. There is no waiver provision for the match. Allowable sources of the match include funds from the following: (1) States and local units of government; (2) Housing and Community Development Act of 1974; (3) Appalachian Regional Development Act; (4) Equitable Sharing Program (Federal asset forfeiture distributions to State and local officials); and (5) private funds.

 

16.597 Motor Vehicle Theft Protection Act Program (Watch Your Car)

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994,Title XXII, Public Law 103-322, 42 USC 14171 et seq.

OBJECTIVES: The Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention Act of 1994 (MVTPA) authorizes the Attorney General to develop, in cooperation with the States, a national voluntary motor vehicle theft prevention program. The national "Watch Your Car" program is designed as a cooperative initiative between the States, local governments, and the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). It allows owners of motor vehicles to voluntarily display a decal or device on their vehicles to alert police that their vehicle is not normally driven between the hours of 1:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. Motorists may also choose to display another decal or device to signify their vehicle is not normally driven across or in the proximity of international land borders or ports.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Federal grant funds may be used for the printing or purchase and distribution of decals, registration and consent forms, public information materials and awareness campaigns, auto glass etching, training programs for law enforcement personnel, registration campaigns, equipment such as audio/visual aids and exhibits, administrative costs, upgrading of computer databases, additional personnel, travel expenses, and overtime for Watch Your Car activities. No funds shall be used for land acquisition nor may funds be used to supplant State or local funds that would otherwise be made available for such purposes.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: A State may apply on behalf of itself and its respective units of local government. If a State's chief motor vehicle theft prevention activities are currently administered by a local agency rather than a State agency, then the local agency may apply on behalf of itself and the other local jurisdictions. Applications are submitted by the point of contact of the State or unit of local government, in writing, and in accordance with established BJA application guidelines.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Eligible beneficiaries include State agencies, county and municipal police departments, crime prevention organizations, and the general public.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Applicants should submit the original copy of the Standard Form 424, signed by the project point of contact to the Director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531. Applicants should submit a complete line item budget and accompanying detailed budget narrative that explains all costs for which Watch Your Car funding is requested and provides sufficient information to document how costs were derived. Finally, applicants should develop an implementation plan to identify the steps they will take to implement the program along with a schedule for the completion of each step.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Grants will be made for amounts up to 100 percent of the costs of the program or projects contained in the approved application. There is no cash match required of grant recipients.

 

16.598 State Identification Systems (SIS) Grant Program

AUTHORIZATION: Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, Public Law 104-132 Section 811(c)(3).

OBJECTIVES: Provides Federal assistance to States to establish, develop, update, or upgrade: (1) computerized identification systems that are compatible and integrated with the database of the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) at the FBI; (2) the capability to analyze deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in a forensic laboratory in ways that are compatible with the combined DNA Identification Systems (CODIS) of the FBI; and (3) automated fingerprint identification systems that are compatible and integrated with the Integrated Automation Fingerprint Identification System (IAFIS) of the FBI.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: In general, expenditures for this grant program may include equipment, supplies, training, contractor-provided services to address backlog or program implementation issues, State and local personnel expenses, and other expenses deemed reasonable and necessary for a qualifying project. The Federal share of funds may cover 100% of the total cost of the project described in the application. States may use grant funds in conjunction with local government agencies or other States in any combination. States receiving funding under the SIS grant program however, are not required to pass through funding to local agencies. Additionally, a State may enter into a compact(s) with another State(s) to carry out the grants.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: To be eligible to receive a grant under this program, a State shall require that each person convicted of a felony of a sexual nature provide to appropriate State law enforcement officials, as designated by the chief executive officer of the State, a sample of blood, saliva, or other specimen necessary to conduct a DNA analysis consistent with the standards established for DNA testing by the FBI Director. The Governor designates a State agency to administer these funds. The designated State agency will be responsible for submitting the State's application, selecting sub-recipients to receive funds, disbursing funds, and performing other administrative functions. For purposes of the SIS grant program, the term "State" means any State of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. For purposes of the allocations made under the SIS grant program, American Samoa and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands shall be considered as one State and for these purposes, 67 percent of the amount allocated shall be allocated to American Samoa and 33 percent to the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Any grant funds which cannot be awarded this fiscal year will be carried forward to the next fiscal year and added to the amount appropriated by Congress for the grant program.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: States, units of local government, and U.S. Territories.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Cost will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments.

MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: The Federal share of funds for the SIS grant program may cover 100% of the total cost of the project described in the application.

 

16.606 State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP)

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, Title II, Subtitle C, Section 20110, 20301, Public Law 103-322, as amended, codified at 8 USC 1231 (i) and 42 USC 13710.

OBJECTIVES: The State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) provides Federal assistance to States and units of local government incurring costs of incarcerating illegal aliens convicted of one felony or two misdemeanor offenses and to expedite the transfer of custody for certain deportable aliens.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: There are no restrictions on or prescribed use of funds. Funds are based on information regarding alien prisoner population. Funds need not be used for correctional purposes or even criminal justice purposes, but may revert to the State or county general fund. This is governed by State law or is at the option of the chief executive officer of the applicant jurisdiction. All that BJA requires is the expeditious drawdown of the payment funds, retention of records for the required audit period (3 years), and information necessary to allow the orderly closeout of the payment, if requested by the grantor agency.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands and localities or local jurisdictions exercising authority with respect to the incarceration of an undocumented criminal alien. This would cover State prison facilities (including those housing juveniles convicted as adults of felony offenses or two or more misdemeanors) and local jails, whether operated by counties or cities. Applicants are generally State Department of Corrections and local sheriffs or city jail administrators, pursuant to designation authority to receive the payment from the chief executive officer of the political entity, e.g., Governor, County Executive, Mayor or City Manager. Note: Only one application is accepted from each separate political division (i.e., State, county, city).

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands and localities or local jurisdictions.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Applicants who are seeking funding must complete an electronic application form via the Office of Justice Programs Grant Management System (GMS). Inmate data, including the proper inmate identifiers, will either be manually key-stroked into the on-line application system, or submitted on-line by electronically attaching the applicable portions of their inmate databases. The authorized official certifies compliance with all SCAAP requirements, including that: the applicant has been designated by the Chief Executive Officer of the applicable unit of government to be the recipient of the federal payment; the inmate identifiers required have been submitted to BJA in the proper format(s) for Immigration and Naturalization Services (INS) verification within the prescribed deadlines; all inmates counted by the applicant have been convicted of either a felony or two misdemeanor offenses under the applicant's law; and, only salary costs for corrections officers were included in the calculations underlying the average inmate cost per year figures. By certifying on-line, the authorizing signing official is also assuring that all federal certifications and assurances are being met. The certification and assurance forms (Assurances, OJP Form 4000/3 and Certifications Regarding Lobbying; Debarment, Suspension and Other Responsibility Matters; and Drug-Free Workplace Requirements, OJP Form 4061/6) are provided on-line to allow applicants to review and accept them electronically. If there are lobbying activities to disclose, applicants should request the Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying, Standard Form - LLL from the U.S. Department of Justice Response Center at 1-(800)-421-677; this form would then need to be filled out and returned to BJA in hardcopy.

MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: This program has no statutory formula. Payments are based on the verified number of aliens incarcerated by each applicant and cost considerations which are used to determine relative percentage of total funding each applicant is eligible to receive.

 

16.607 The Bulletproof Vest Partnership Program

AUTHORIZATION: The Bulletproof Vest Partnership Grant Act of 1998, 42 USC 3796ll et seq of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, as amended.

OBJECTIVES: To protect the lives of law enforcement officers by helping State, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies provide officers with armored vests.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: The program pays up to 50 percent of the total cost of each vest order. Total cost includes the cost of the vests, vest carriers, attachments, inserts, and covers considered integral or essential for its proper care, use, and wearability, shipping, handling, fitting charges, and applicable taxes. The total invoiced price, after all vendor and prompt payment discounts have been deducted, is what the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) uses to determine the Federal match. This program only allows the purchase of body armor that has been tested and found to comply with the National Institute of Justice's (NIJ) Standard 0101.03 Ballistic Resistance of Police Body Armor. Beginning in FY 2000, it will also allow for the purchase of stab-resistant body armor, as the applicable NIJ standard is adopted and approved. Vest models are listed on the official BJA vest web site, http://vests.ojp.gov.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Only chief executives of jurisdictions (or their designees) may apply for funds. Jurisdictions are defined as general purpose units of local government (e.g., cities, towns, townships, boroughs, counties, etc.), Federally-recognized Indian tribes, the 50 State governments, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands. The chief executive of the jurisdiction registers on-line, submits the jurisdiction application, and requests payment for completed vest orders.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Only law enforcement officers may receive vests through this program. According to the Act, "law enforcement officer" means any officer, agent, or employee of a State, unit of local government, or an Indian tribe authorized by law or by a government agency to engage in or supervise the prevention, detection, or investigation of any violation of criminal law, or authorized by law to supervise sentenced criminal offenders. Eligible officers may be full-time, part-time, paid or volunteer.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Eligible jurisdictions must be general purpose units of local government, Federally-recognized Indian tribes, the 50 State governments, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands. The validity of the on-line registration process is verified through independent reviews which may include certification by the banking institutions serving the jurisdiction, the U.S. Census Bureau, and agencies within the U.S. Department of Justice.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: The program requires that each applicant jurisdiction be responsible for providing at least 50 percent of the cost of each vest purchased. Tribal governments may use federal funds to provide this match; all other jurisdictions must use non-federal match funds. Non-federal fund sources include state and/or local jurisdiction revenues, private or personal funds, and contributions from insurance or workman's compensation consortiums. Asset forfeiture funds may also be used to meet the jurisdiction's matching requirement.

 

16.608 Tribal Court Assistance Program

AUTHORIZATION: FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law 106-553.

OBJECTIVES: To assist tribal governments in the development, enhancement, and continuing operation of tribal judicial systems, including inter-tribal court systems.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: These funds will be made available to Federally recognized Indian Tribal governments for the development, enhancement, and continuing operation of tribal courts. The Act prohibits the use of these funds for supplanting of State and local funds, land acquisition or construction projects.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Federally recognized Indian Tribal governments are eligible to apply for and receive funds under this program.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Indian Tribal governments.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Grant may be made for amounts up to 100 per centum of the costs of the program or projects contained in the approved applications.

 

16.609 Planning, Implementing, and Enhancing Strategies in Community Prosecution

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, as amended, Title I; 42 USC 50 et. seq.; Crime Control Act of 1990, Public Law 101-647, FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law 106-553.

OBJECTIVES: The Community Prosecution Program emphasizes the participation of community leaders and residents in developing strategies for public safety with prosecutors and other community justice system officials. The program serves as a mechanism for community participation that allows communities to identify local priorities and engage in problem solving and strategic planning, as well as regular communication between the prosecutor's office and community residents. In addition, the program helps develop a proactive orientation to crime control, emphasizing prevention and enforcement.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Discretionary Grant funds provide Federal financial assistance to public or private agencies and private, nonprofit organizations for the purposes of: undertaking education and training programs for criminal justice personnel; providing technical assistance to State and local units of government; undertaking projects that are national or multi-jurisdictional in scope and that address the purpose areas authorized by the Act; and providing financial assistance to public agencies and private nonprofit organizations for demonstration programs that in view of previous research or experience, are likely to be a success in more that one jurisdiction. The Act prohibits the use of these funds for supplanting of State and local funds, land acquisition or construction projects.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: State, county, city, and tribal public prosecutor offices are eligible to apply for and receive funds under this program.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local governments, public and private organizations, Indian Tribal government, community organizations, and the general public.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Eligible applicants must provide a budget submission.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Grants may be made for amounts up to 100 per centum of the costs of the programs or projects contained in the approved applications.

 

16.610 Regional Information Sharing Systems Grants (RISS)

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Public Law 90-351; 42 USC 3796h.

OBJECTIVES: To enhance the ability of the State and local criminal justice agencies to identify, target, and remove criminal conspiracies and activities that span jurisdictional boundaries. The first objective of the Regional Information Sharing Systems Program (RISS) is to encourage and facilitate the rapid exchange and sharing of information among Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies pertaining to known or suspected criminals or criminal activity. The second objective is to enhance coordination and communication among agencies that are in pursuit of criminal conspiracies determined to be inter-jurisdictional in nature. In addition, the RISS Program may provide technical and financial resources, such as specialized equipment, training, and investigative funds, to augment existing multi-jurisdictional enforcement resources and operations.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Up to 100 percent of total project grant costs are funded through Federal assistance. Cost-sharing is governed by Appropriation Act requirements. However, projects are encouraged to obtain and utilize additional funds through voluntary contributions, membership fees or dues, fees for service, or other sources from member agencies or governmental units benefiting from project services. Such funds will be considered program income and must be used to augment project operations or to reduce the Federal share of project costs.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Six RISS projects are authorized as eligible to receive funding to provide services to law enforcement agencies throughout the nation. The projects are: The Middle Atlantic Great-Lakes Organized Crime Law Enforcement Center (MAGLOCLEN), the Mid-States Organized Crime Information Center (MOCIC), the New England State Police Information Network (NESPIN), the Regional Organized Crime Information Center (ROCIC), the Rocky Mountain Information Network (RMIN), and the Western States Information Network (WSIN).

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local criminal justice agencies; Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies and personnel benefit from this program.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The six RISS projects are required to submit a Federal application for assistance, as well as a detailed program and budget narrative.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Projects are awarded 100 percent of the project costs and no match is required.

 

16.611 Closed-Circuit Televising of Child Victims of Abuse (CCTV)

AUTHORIZATION: Victims of Child Abuse Act, Public Law 90-351, as amended, 42 USC 3796aa, et. seq.

OBJECTIVES: To provide equipment and personnel training for the closed-circuit televising and videotaping of the testimony of children in criminal proceedings for the violation of laws relating to the abuse of children.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Up to 75 percent of total project grant costs may be funded through Federal assistance.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Limited competition-a State or local unit of government that has in effect a law allowing the closed-circuit televising or video taping of testimony of children in criminal proceedings relating to the abuse of children.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local criminal justice agencies; Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies and personnel; public non-profit organizations, and youth benefit from this program.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Eligible States and units of local government.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Projects are awarded 75 percent of the project costs. A 25 percent match is required.

 

16.612 National White Collar Crime Center (NWCCC)

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Public Law 90-351, as amended; 42 USC 3760.

OBJECTIVES: To provide a nationwide support system for the prevention, investigation, and prosecution of economic crime. The National White Collar Crime Center (NWCCC) links criminal justice agencies across jurisdictional borders and bridges the gap between local and State criminal justice agency economic crime-fighting capabilities and the minimum threshold for Federal investigation and intervention. The Center provides support for the prevention, investigation, and prosecution of economic crime through a combination of research, training, and investigative support services. The center also hosts the National Cybercrime Training partnership, which provides training to State and Local law enforcement and prosecutorial agencies in how to respond successfully to computer related crime.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Up to 100 percent of total project grant costs are funded through Federal assistance. Cost-sharing is governed by Appropriation Act requirements. However, the project is encouraged to obtain and utilize additional funds, through voluntary contributions, membership fees or dues, fees for service, or other sources, from member agencies or governmental units benefiting from project services. Such funds will be considered program income and must be used to augment project operations or to reduce the Federal share of project costs.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: State and local law enforcement authorities.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local criminal justice agencies; Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies, as well as regulatory agencies benefit from this program.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The NWCCC is required to submit a Federal application for assistance, as well as a detailed program and budget narrative.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Project is awarded 100 percent of the project costs and no match is required.

 

16.613 Scams Targeting the Elderly

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, Public Law 103-322; Section 250005 (3).

OBJECTIVES: To reduce the incidence of fraud and abuse against the elderly through training and technical assistance programs, demonstration sites, public awareness initiatives, and reporting of fraud to the National Fraud Information Center.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: This discretionary grant program is intended to assist law enforcement in preventing and stopping marketing scams against senior citizens. Funding will support training and technical assistance, including a telemarketing fraud task force; State and local demonstration programs; and public awareness initiatives and assistance through the National Fraud Information Center.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: State and local law enforcement agencies, as well as public and private nonprofit organizations.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local criminal justice agencies; Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies and personnel; public nonprofit organizations; and the elderly benefit from this program.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Applicants are required to submit a Federal application for assistance, as well as a detailed program and budget narrative.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Projects are awarded 100 percent of the project costs and no match is required.

 

16.614 State and Local Anti-Terrorism Training (SLATT)

AUTHORIZATION: Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, Section 822, Public Law 104-132; 42 USC 3760, 3751, (b)(26).

OBJECTIVES: To provide delivery of specialized, multi-agency anti-terrorism preparedness training. This training, along with related research, law enforcement intelligence, operational issues development, and technical assistance support activities, is delivered to State and local law enforcement and prosecution authorities. While State and local law enforcement preparation and readiness issues addressed in this project are tailored to interventions in domestic terrorism, major portions of the program's preparedness and operational readiness outcomes are equally applicable to any terrorist threat or incident, whether domestically or internationally inspired.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Grant program funds are intended to: (1) provide State and local law enforcement (including prosecution authorities) a general awareness and working knowledge of domestic terrorist and "political" extremist movements; (2) disseminate information relating to vital elements of law enforcement anti-terrorism preparedness and readiness; (3) provide a general planning orientation to State and local law enforcement pertaining to crisis and consequence management and incident command, including essential elements requisite to conducting criminal investigations and prosecutions of terrorist threats and incidents; and (4) maintain and enhance a domestic terrorism public source database. Standard restrictions as outlined in OJP's Financial Guide apply.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: State and local law enforcement and prosecution authorities.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local criminal justice agencies are the primary beneficiaries of this program.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The Institute for Intergovernmental Research is required to submit an application for assistance, as well as a detailed program and budget narrative.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: The project is awarded at 100 percent of project costs; no match is required.

 

16.615 Public Safety Officers' Educational Assistance (PSOEA)

AUTHORIZATION: Educational Assistance to Dependents of Civilian Federal Law Enforcement Officers Killed or Disabled in the Line of Duty, 42 USC 3796d.

OBJECTIVES: The PSOEA Program, an expansion of the Federal Law Enforcement Dependents Assistance (FLEDA) Program, provides financial assistance for higher education to the spouses and children of public safety officers killed in line of duty or who received permanent and totally disabling injuries that occurred on or after October 1, 1997. The PSOEA Act makes program benefits available retroactively to families of Public Safety officers killed in the line of duty on or after January 1, 1978. The effective date for families of permanently and totally disabled Public Safety officers is October 3, 1996.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Program funds are intended solely to defray eligible applicants' educational expenses, which may include tuition, room and board, books, supplies, and fees consistent with the educational, professional or vocational objectives of the applicant. Funds are restricted to defray above costs only. A certification of educational use is required.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Dependents who: 1) attend a program of education at an eligible institution; or 2) are the spouse and/or surviving children under the age of 27 of Federal, State and local public safety officers, whose deaths or permanent and totally disabling injuries are covered by the Public Safety Officers' Benefits (PSOB) Program (42 USC 3796 et seq.) are eligible for this program. A public safety officer is a person serving a public agency in an official capacity, with or without compensation, as a law enforcement officer, firefighter or member of a public rescue squad or ambulance crew.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: The spouse and surviving children under the age of 27 of Federal, State and local public safety officers receive the ultimate benefits from this program.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Documentation needed to apply for assistance includes: the Application for Public Safety Officer's Educational Assistance (42 USC 3796 d); educational transcripts; acceptance letters to educational/professional institutions; schedule of classes; verification of full or part-time status; and certification of other forms of educational assistance. Contact the PSOB office at 1-888-SIGNL13 (744-6513) for full credential/documentation requirements.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Not applicable.



OFFICE FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME

 

16.321 Antiterrorism and Emergency Assistance Program

AUTHORIZATION: Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (VOCA), 42 U.S.C. 10601,10603b.

OBJECTIVES: Funding available through the Antiterrorism and Emergency Reserve of the Crime Victims Fund (Victims of Crime Act, 42 U.S.C. 10601(d)(5)(A)) is designed to provide timely relief and to help respond to immediate and ongoing challenges in providing victim assistance services in the aftermath of cases of terrorism or mass violence. Section 42 U.S.C. 10603b of VOCA outlines the specific authority of the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) to provide compensation and assistance to victims of acts of terrorism or mass violence within the United States and assistance to victims of terrorism and mass violence outside the United States. Section 10603c of VOCA establishes the related program to provide compensation payments to victims of international terrorism.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: This program is designed to supplement the available resources and services of entities responding to acts of terrorism or mass violence. Thus, Emergency Reserve support may be granted if needed services cannot be adequately provided with existing resources, or if the provision of services and assistance will result in an undue financial hardship on the jurisdiction=s ability to respond to other victims of crime. In cases of terrorism or mass violence occurring within the United States, 42 U.S.C. 10603b(b) authorizes the Director of OVC (Athe Director@) to provide funding to eligible State crime victim compensation and assistance programs, as well as victim service organizations, public agencies (including Federal, State, or local governments) and non-governmental organizations, for emergency relief to benefit victims, including crisis response efforts, assistance, training and technical assistance, and ongoing assistance, including during any investigation or prosecution, to victims of terrorist acts or mass violence. This section also allows supplemental OVC grants for purposes of compensation payments for terrorism or mass violence occurring within the United States. In cases of terrorism or mass violence occurring outside the United States, 42 U.S.C. 10603b(a) authorizes the Director to make grants to States, victim service organizations, and public agencies (including Federal, State, and local governments) and non-governmental organizations that provide assistance to victims of crime, for emergency relief, including crisis response efforts, assistance, training and technical assistance, and ongoing assistance, including during any investigation or prosecution, to victims of terrorist acts or mass violence occurring outside the United States.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS: Applicants eligible for funding include State victim assistance and victim compensation programs, public agencies including Federal, State, and local governments, and victim service and non-governmental organizations. In cases within the United States, applications will be accepted only from the jurisdiction in which the crime occurred unless a statute establishes a special authorization and appropriation supporting allocations to other jurisdictions, or a compelling justification can be provided to the OVC Director supporting requests from other jurisdictions. In cases abroad, eligible recipients of compensation or assistance benefits include (1) victims who are nationals of the United States or officers or employees of the U.S. government, who are killed or injured as a result of a terrorist act or mass violence occurring outside the United States; and (2) in the case of a person who is under the age of 18, incompetent, incapacitated, or deceased, a family member or legal guardian of that person. Only terrorist actions occurring after December 21, 1988, for which there is an ongoing investigation or prosecution as of April 24, 1996, are eligible for coverage. In no event shall an individual who is criminally culpable for the terrorist act of mass violence receive any assistance under this program, either directly or on behalf of a victim.

 

16.575 Crime Victim Assistance

AUTHORIZATION: Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (VOCA), Section 1402; 1404, 42 U.S.C. 10601; 10603.

OBJECTIVES: Up to $20,000,000 of the initial fund deposits shall be available for grants under Section 1404A. Of the remaining amount deposited in the fund in a particular year, 47.5 percent shall be available for Crime Victim Assistance Formula Grants under 1404 (a). Under Section 1404B, the OVC Director may make supplemental grants to state victim services organizations, public agencies, and non-governmental organizations for providing assistance including emergency relief, crisis response efforts, assistance, training, and technical assistance to U.S. Nationals, who are victims of a terrorist act or mass violence occurring within the U.S. Under 1404C, the OVC Director may provide compensation to US Nationals, or employees of the U.S. government who are victims of international terrorism occurring outside the United States. Under Section 1402 the Director of OVC may retain funds in an Antiterrorism emergency reserve fund up to $50,000 million.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Funds under this program shall be used by states and territories to provide direct services to crime victims with the following exception: states may retain up to 5 percent of their grant for administrative purposes including training. A victim assistance program is an eligible crime victim assistance program under VOCA if it: (1) is operated by a public agency or a nonprofit organization, or a combination of such agencies or organizations or of both such agencies and organizations, and provides services to victims of crime; (2) demonstrates a record of providing effective services to victims of crime or substantial financial support from nonfederal sources; (3) utilizes volunteers in providing such services, unless and to the extent the chief executive determines that compelling reasons exist to waive this requirement; (4) promotes within the community, coordinated public and private efforts to aid crime victims; (5) assists potential recipients in seeking crime victim compensation benefits; and (6) does not discriminate against victims because they disagree with the way a state prosecutes a case. An eligible crime victim assistance program shall expend sums received under subsection (a) only for providing direct services to victims of crime. The chief executive of each state shall (A) certify that priority shall be given to eligible crime victim assistance programs providing assistance to victims of sexual assault, spousal abuse, or child abuse, and to programs serving previously underserved victims of violent crime, as determined by the state, (B) certify that funds awarded to eligible crime victim assistance programs will not be used to supplant state and local funds otherwise available for crime victim assistance; and (C) provide such other information and assurances related to the purposes of this section as the Director may reasonably require. DEFINITIONS: as used in this program, (1) the term "state" includes the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, and any other territory or possession of the United States; (2) the term "services to victims of crime" includes (a) crisis intervention services to provide emotional support in cases arising from the occurrence of crime; (b) providing, in an emergency, transportation to court, short-term child care services, and temporary housing and security measures; (c) assistance in participating in criminal justice proceedings; and (d) payment of all reasonable costs for a forensic medical examination of sexual assault victims, to the extent that such costs are otherwise not reimbursed or paid; and (3) the term "chief executive" includes a person designated by the governor to perform the functions of the chief executive under this section.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Any State, the District of Columbia, and any other territory or possession of the United States are eligible. Funds may be subgranted to eligible public and nonprofit organizations or combinations of such agencies or organizations or of both such agencies and organizations that provide direct services to victims of crime.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Any member of the general public who has been a victim of a violent crime or those who are survivors of victims of crime.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Applications from the designated state agency for this program must be submitted on Standard Form 424 at a time specified by the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs. The state grant applicant, by completing the grant application, and by receiving a VOCA victim assistance grant award, certifies: (1) that funds awarded to eligible crime victim assistance programs will not be utilized to supplant State and/or local funds that would otherwise be available for crime victim assistance; (2) that the state will provide such accounting, auditing, monitoring and evaluation procedures as may be necessary, and keep such records as the Office of Justice Programs may prescribe, to assure fiscal control, proper management and efficient disbursement of federal funds; (3) that the state shall give priority to programs aiding victims of sexual assault, spousal abuse, or child abuse, and to programs serving previously underserved victims of violent crimes as determined by the state; (4) that the state will submit to the Office of Justice Programs Subgrant Award Reports and Performance Reports concerning the activities carried out with the federal funds received and will maintain and report such data and information as required; (5) that the state will adhere to the audit and financial management requirements set forth in the OJP Financial Guide; (6) that the state will comply with all applicable federal and VOCA nondiscrimination requirements; and (7) that the information in the application is correct and that the State will comply with all applicable provisions of the Victims of Crime Act and other federal laws, regulations, and circulars. Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No. A-87 for state and local governments.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: All States and most Territories receive an annual VOCA victim assistance grant. Each state, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico receive a base amount of $500,000. The territories of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, and American Samoa, and the Republic of Palau each receive a base amount of $200,000. Additional funds are distributed based on populations. That portion of the then remaining funds will be divided among all states or territories according to population (U.S. Census Bureau). If the amount available for grants under this program is insufficient to provide $500,000 to each state, the base amount available shall be distributed equally among the States and territories.

 

16.576 Crime Victim Compensation

AUTHORIZATION: Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (VOCA), Sections 1402; 1403, 42 U.S.C. 10601; 10602.

OBJECTIVES: Up to $20,000,000 of the initial fund deposits shall be available for grants under Section 1404A. Of the remaining amount deposited into the fund in a particular fiscal year, 47.5 percent shall be available for grants under Section 1403 Crime Victim Compensation Formula Grants.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Funds under this program shall be used by the states for awards of compensation benefits to crime victims, with the following exception: States may retain up to 5 percent of their total grant for administrative purposes. A crime victim compensation program is an eligible-crime-victim-compensation program if: (1) such program is operated by a state and offers compensation to victims and survivors of victims of criminal violence, including drunk driving and domestic violence for: (A) medical expenses attributable to a physical injury resulting from a compensable crime, including expenses for mental health counseling and care; (B) loss of wages attributable to a physical injury resulting from a compensable crime; and (C) funeral expenses attributable to a death resulting from a compensable crime; (2) such program promotes victim cooperation with the reasonable requests of law enforcement authorities; (3) such state, possession or territory certifies that grants received under this program will not be used to supplant funds otherwise available to provide crime victim compensation; (4) such program, as to compensable crimes occurring within the state, possession or territory, makes compensation awards to victims who are nonresidents of the state, possession or territory on the basis of the same criteria used to make awards to victims who are residents of the state, possession or territory; (5) such program provides compensation to victims of federal crimes occurring within the state on the same basis that such program provides compensation to victims of state crimes; (6) such program provides compensation to residents of the state who are victims of crimes occurring outside the state if (A) the crimes would be compensable crimes had they occurred inside the state and (B) the places the crimes occurred are in states not having eligible crime victim compensation programs; (7) such program does not, except pursuant to rules issued by the program to prevent unjust enrichment of the offender, deny compensation to any victim because of that victim's familial relationship to the offender, or because of the sharing of a residence by the victim and the offender; (8) such program does not provide compensation to any person who has been convicted of an offense under federal law with respect to any time period during which the person is delinquent in paying a fine, other monetary penalty, or restitution imposed for the offense; and (9) such program provides other information and assurances related to the purposes of this section as the Director may reasonably require. DEFINITIONS: As used in this section-(1) the term "property damage" does not include damage to prosthetic devices, eyeglasses or other corrective lenses, or dental devices; (2) the term "medical expenses" includes, to the extent provided under the eligible crime victim compensation program, expenses for eyeglasses and other corrective lenses, for dental services and devices and prosthetic devices, and for services rendered in accordance with a method of healing recognized by the law of the State; and (3) the term "compensable crime" means a crime the victims of which are eligible for compensation under the eligible crime victim compensation program, and include driving while intoxicated and domestic violence.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, and any other possession or territory of the United States who have an established eligible crime victim compensation program, and who meet the eligibility requirements discussed above.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Victims of crime that results in death or physical or personal injury and are determined eligible under the State victim compensation statute. State compensation statutes either declare that coverage extends generally to any crime resulting in physical or personal injury, or they list all specific crimes that can be covered.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: As provided in VOCA, formula grant awards to an eligible state crime victim compensation program are based on 60 percent of the amounts states expended during the fiscal year preceding the year of collections for the Crime Victims Fund, other than amounts awarded for property damage. If the sums available in the Fund for grants under this program are insufficient to provide grants of 60 percent as provided above, grants from the sums available will be made to each eligible crime victim compensation program so that all such programs receive the same percentage of the amounts awarded by such programs during the preceding fiscal year, other than amounts awarded for property damage.

 

16.582 Crime Victim Assistance/Discretionary Grants

AUTHORIZATION: Victims of Crime Act of 1984, Section 1402; 1404, 42 U.S.C. 10601, 10603

OBJECTIVES: The Office for Victims of Crime administers a discretionary grant program and other assistance programs for crime victims with amounts set-aside from deposits into the Crime Victims Fund grants for: (1) demonstration projects, program evaluation, compliance efforts, and training and technical assistance services to eligible crime victims assistance programs; (2) the financial support of services to victims of Federal crime by eligible crime victim assistance programs; and (1) the financial support of fellowships or clinical internships. The purpose of the demonstration and training and technical assistance grants is to improve the overall quality of services delivered to crime victims through the provision of training and technical assistance to providers. Funds are also available to improve the Federal and state responses to victims of Federal crime. Of the amount available for training and technical assistance and services to victims of Federal crimes, not less than 50 percent shall be used for demonstration programs, program evaluation, compliance efforts, and technical assistance, and not more than 50 percent for services to victims of Federal crimes.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Funds are specifically for: (1) demonstration projects, program evaluation, compliance efforts, and training and technical assistance services to eligible crime victims assistance programs; (2) the financial support of services to victims of Federal crime by eligible crime victim assistance programs; and (3) the financial support of individual fellowships or clinical internships which may be created by the Director. For the purpose of the grants authorized in 42 U.S.C. 10603, an eligible crime victim association program is defined as: (a) operated by a public agency or a nonprofit organization, or a combination of such agencies and organizations, and providing service to victims of crime; (b) demonstrating (i) a record of providing effective services to victims of crime and financial support from sources other than the Fund; or (ii) substantial financial support from sources other than the Fund; (c) utilizing volunteers in providing such services, unless to the extent the chief executive determines that compelling reasons exist to waive this requirement; (d) promoting within the community served coordinated public and private efforts to the crime victims; and (e) assisting potential recipients in seeking crime compensation benefits. For purpose of grants authorized for assistance to victims of Federal crime, services includes (a) training of law enforcement personnel in the delivery of services to victims of Federal crime; (b) preparation, publication, and distribution of informational materials setting forth services offered to victims of crime; and concerning services for victims of Federal crime for use by Federal law enforcement and other responsible Federal officials; and (c) salaries of personnel who provide services to victims of crime, to the extent that these personnel provide such services.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Criteria will vary depending on the grant. Generally, eligible applicants may include American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and tribal organizations, states, United States Attorneys' offices, eligible victim service agencies, private nonprofit agencies, and Federal training centers. Applicants for Victim Assistance in Indian Country grants must be an Indian Tribe, a Tribal organization, a partnership or a non-profit organization that provides direct services to victims of crime in areas of Indian Country that are under Federal criminal justice jurisdiction. Individuals are eligible to apply for fellowships or clinical internships.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: These are discretionary grants. Eligibility depends on the specific nature of the grant but may include a wide variety of public and private nonprofit agencies.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Applications for this program must be on Standard Form 424 at a time specified by the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs and must contain at a minimum such information as OJP/OVC chooses to request. This includes, but is not limited to: (1) OJP Form 4061/6 (Certifications Regarding Lobbying; Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters; and Drug-Free Workplace Requirements); (2) OJP Standard Assurances Forms; and (3) Certifications that the information in the application is correct and that the applicant will comply with all applicable provisions of the Victims of Crime Act and other Federal laws, (including subtitle A, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990) regulations, and circulars. Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-21;A-87; or A-122 depending upon the type of organization that applies for funding.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: There are no formula or matching requirements, except for Victim Assistance in Indian Country discretionary grants which have a 10 percent "in kind" match requirement.

 

16.583 Children's Justice Act Discretionary Grants for Native Americans (Children's Justice Act Partnership for Native American Indian Tribes)

AUTHORIZATION: Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (VOCA), Section 1402, 42 U.S.C. 10601(g)(1)

OBJECTIVES: Fifteen percent of the funds from the Crime Victims Fund that are transferred pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 10603a to the Department of Health and Human Services as part of the Children's Justice Act are statutorily reserved by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) to make grants for the purpose of assisting Native American Indian tribes in developing, establishing, and operating programs designed to improve the handling of child abuse cases, particularly cases of child sexual abuse, in a manner which limits additional trauma to the child victim and improves the investigation and prosecution of cases of child abuse.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Funds are available specifically for the purpose of assisting Indian tribes in developing, establishing, and operating programs designed to improve (a) the handling of child abuse cases, particularly cases of child sexual abuse, in a manner which limits additional trauma to the victim and (b) the investigation and prosecution of cases of child abuse, particularly child sexual abuse.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Federally recognized Indian tribal governments and nonprofit Indian organizations that provide services to Native Americans. Specific criteria will vary depending on the grant.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Native American youth who are victims of child abuse and/or child sexual abuse.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Applications must be on Standard Form 424 at a time specified by the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs and must contain such information as OJP/OVC chooses to request. This includes but is not limited to: (1) OJP Form 4061/6 (Certifications Regarding Lobbying; Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters; and Drug-Free Workplace Requirements); (2) OJP Standard Assurances; and (3) Certifications that the information in the application is correct and that the Grantee will comply with all applicable provisions of the Victims of Crime Act and other Federal laws, regulations, and circulars, including Subtitle A, Title II of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: In-kind match required as follows: 10 percent year 1; 15 percent year 2; 25 percent year 3.



CIVIL RIGHTS DIVISION

 

16.108 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) Technical Assistance Program

AUTHORIZATION: Americans with Disabilities Act, Public Law 101-336, Section 506.

OBJECTIVES: To ensure that public accommodations and commercial facilities and State and local governments learn of the requirements of Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and acquire the knowledge needed to comply with these requirements.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Grants limited to the provision of technical assistance and educational activities that have a wide impact, including the development and dissemination of materials, the conduct of seminars, conferences, and training, and the provision of technical assistance on a state, regional or national basis depending on the funding priorities announced each year. Because the grant program is educational in nature, the Department does not fund projects to research or resolve issues that are outside the scope of the Department's current ADA regulation and court interpretations. The program is not intended to fund or support site-specific compliance implementation (e.g., funding to make specific facilities more accessible), or to fund or support inspections, reviews, or tests to determine whether an entity is meeting its compliance obligations.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Nonprofit organizations, including trade and professional associations or their subsidiaries, organizations representing State and local governments or their employees, other organizations representing entities covered by the ADA, State and local governments agencies, national and State-based organizations representing persons with disabilities, and individuals.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: The target audiences of funded grants will include State and local governments, businesses and nonprofit organizations that operate public accommodations and commercial facilities, and individuals with disabilities.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Not applicable.

MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Not applicable.

 

16.110 Education and Enforcement of the Antidiscrimination Provision of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA)

AUTHORIZATION: Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 USC 1324(b).

OBJECTIVES: To educate employers and workers about their rights and responsibilities under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) in order to prevent employment discrimination based on citizenship status or national origin.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: The anti-discrimination provision of the INA prohibits employment discrimination on the basis of national origin and citizenship status against U.S. Citizens and other legally authorized workers. The Office of Special Counsel for Immigration Related Unfair Employment Practices (OSC) was established to ensure that these individuals are not discriminated against with respect to hiring, firing or recruiting or referral for a fee based on their citizenship status or national origin. INA's prohibition against citizenship status discrimination covers: (1) U.S. citizens and nationals; (2) legal permanent residents; (3) temporary residents under IRCA's legalization program, Special Agricultural Worker program (SAW) or Replenishment Agricultural Worker program (RAW); (4) refugees; and (5) asylees. The INA also makes it illegal for employers with four to 14 employees to discriminate, with respect to hiring, firing, recruitment or referral for a fee, against any individual on the basis of his or her national origin. Employers with 15 or more employees are covered under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Please note that for national origin charges, OSC has jurisdiction over employers with between four and 14 employees. National origin charges against employers with 15 or more employees come under the jurisdiction of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which enforces Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. There may be exceptions to this general rule, so charges incorrectly filed with OSC are automatically referred to the EEOC and vice versa. All charges of citizenship status discrimination against employers with four or more employees should be filed with OSC. In addition, under the document abuse provision of the law, employers must accept all forms of work authorization and proof of identity allowed by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) for completion of the Employment Eligibility Verification (I-9) Form and that on their face appear genuine. Employers may not prefer or require one form of documentation over another for hiring purposes. Employers may not, with the intent to discriminate, require more or different documents than required. The goal of the grant program is to educate workers and employers about the antidiscrimination provisions outlined above in order to reduce the incidents of employment discrimination through nonprofit, private groups and state and local governments and, if applicable, their sub-grantees.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Private, nonprofit institutions/ organizations, state and local government entities, local, regional or national ethnic and immigrants' rights organizations, trade associations, industry groups, professional organizations or other nonprofit entities providing information and/or services to potential victims of discrimination and/or employers.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Small businesses, agricultural producers, immigrant assistance groups-the largest communities of which are Latino and Asian Pacific American-contractors, industries, workers and employers.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Not applicable.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: This program has no statutory formula or matching requirements.



DRUG COURTS PROGRAM OFFICE

 

16.585 Drug Court Discretionary Grant Program (Drug Court Program)

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994,Title V, Public Law 103-322, 108 Stat. 1796, 42 USC 3796ii et. seq. -3796ii-8; Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968.

OBJECTIVES: To support the establishment and development of drug courts. The FY 2001 Drug Court Grant Program is responsive to, and supportive of, developments in the field. As a result, the Drug Courts Program Office (DCPO) announces the availability of implementation and enhancement grants. Implementation grants are available for up to $500,000 for up to 3 years. There are separate categories this year for communities applying to implement an adult drug court and a juvenile drug court. Enhancement grants are available for up to $300,000 for up to 2 years. There are separate categories for single drug court enhancement and statewide enhancements. Lastly, DCPO has a special interest in encouraging communities to develop drug courts that give special attention to alcohol problems in addition to drugs, for example, driving under the influence (DUI) or driving while intoxicated (DWI) drug courts.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Allowable uses of funds are outlined in the Drug Courts Program Guideline available from the Department of Justice Response Center. Drug Court Programs under Title V will be for nonviolent adult and juvenile offenders, and involve early and continuous judicial supervision over the nonviolent substance abusing offenders and the integrated administration of sanctions and services including: (1) mandatory periodic testing for the use of controlled substances or other addictive substances during any period of supervised release or probation; (2) substance abuse treatment for each participant; (3) diversion, probation, or other supervised release involving the possibility of prosecution, confinement, or incarceration based on noncompliance with program requirements; and (4) programmatic, offender management and aftercare services.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Grants can be given to States, State courts, local courts, units of local government and Indian tribal governments, acting directly or through agreements with other public or private entities. Applicants may choose to submit joint applications with other eligible jurisdictions for statewide, regional, and multi- jurisdictional drug court programs. With joint applications, one organization must be designated as the applicant and any co-applicants designated accordingly. The applicant organization must be eligible and the other agencies/organizations must provide supporting documentation. All applicants must demonstrate that they have the management and financial capabilities to effectively plan and implement projects of the size and scope described in the application kit. Nonprofit and for-profit agencies are not eligible applicants. For an application from a subunit of government (e.g., county probation department, district attorney's office, pretrial services agency) to be considered, it must be designated by letter as representing an eligible applicant (described above). For example, the county court or county executive may designate the county probation or county district attorney's office as its representative for the purpose of application. In this instance, the applicant continues to be the designating State, court system, or unit of local government. The county probation, district attorney's office, or other designated subunit, is the organization authorized to submit an application on behalf of the eligible applicant.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: States, local governments, Indian tribal governments, public or private entities.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The application must include: Application for Federal Assistance (Standard Form 424); Applicant Information page; a one-page program abstract summarizing the goals and objectives of the grant request; program narrative; letters of support; detailed budget and budget narrative; administrative requirements; and assurances and certifications. See program announcement for more information.

MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: The Federal share of a grant received under this subtitle may not exceed 75 percent of the total cost of an applicant's projected budget. The matching requirement is a 25 percent match provided by the applicant. A portion of the match must be cash. This is required by statute; the term "portion" is not defined.



CORRECTIONS PROGRAM OFFICE

 

16.586 Violent Offender Incarceration and Truth in Sentencing Incentive Grants (Prison Grants)

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994,Title II, Subtitle A, as amended, Public Law 104-134, 20101-20112; 42 USC 13701 et. seq.

OBJECTIVES: To provide funds to individual States and to States organized as regional compacts to build or expand: (1) correctional facilities to increase the bed capacity for the confinement of Part 1 violent offenders; (2) temporary or permanent correctional facilities including facilities on military bases, prison barges and boot camps for the confinement of nonviolent offenders for the purpose of freeing prison space for violent offenders; and (3) jails.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Grant funds may be used to build or expand permanent or temporary correctional facilities to increase bed space for the confinement of adult and juvenile violent offenders. Up to 15% of a State's formula grant may be awarded to counties and other units of local government to construct, develop, expand, modify or improve jails and other correctional facilities. Under exigent circumstances, funds may be used to increase capacity for the confinement of nonviolent juvenile offenders. Beginning with fiscal year 1999 grant funds, ten percent of the award may be used to implement drug testing policies that meet the Attorney General's Guidelines.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: States and States organized in multi-State compacts are eligible to apply. State means a State of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the United States Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Local units of government must apply directly to their States for grant funds.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local correctional agencies.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must submit a completed Application for Federal Assistance (standard form 424), including signed assurances that it will comply with statutory and administrative requirements. Applicants must also demonstrate compliance with the statutory requirements for the three Tiers of the Violent Offender Incarceration Program and those for Truth In Sentencing to qualify for funding from each allocation. States must also demonstrate an ability to operate facilities built with these funds, recognize the rights of crime victims, and have implemented a program of drug testing and intervention for offenders under corrections supervision.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: The Federal share of a grant-funded project may not exceed 90 percent of the total costs of the project. The 10 percent matching funds must be in the form of a cash match.

 

16.593 Residential Substance Abuse Treatment for State Prisoners (RSAT)

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968,Title I, Section 1001, as amended, Public Law 90-351, Public Law 103-322, §32101, 42 USC 3796ff, et seq.

OBJECTIVES: To assist States and units of local government in developing and implementing residential substance abuse treatment programs within State and local correctional facilities in which prisoners are incarcerated for a period of time sufficient to permit substance abuse treatment.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: The Residential Substance Abuse Treatment formula grant funds may be used to implement residential substance abuse programs that provide individual and group treatment activities for offenders in residential facilities operated by State and local correctional agencies. These programs must: (1) last between 6 and 12 months; (2) be provided in residential treatment facilities set apart from the general correctional population; (3) focus on the substance abuse problems of the inmate; and (4) develop the inmate's cognitive, behavioral, social, vocational, and other skills to solve the substance abuse and related problems. Grant funds shall not be used for land acquisition or construction projects.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands are eligible to apply. The State office may award subgrants to State agencies and units of local government. Applicant States must agree to implement or continue to require urinalysis and/or other proven reliable forms of drug and alcohol testing of individuals assigned to residential substance abuse treatment programs in correctional facilities.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local correctional agencies will implement programs to provide treatment to incarcerated offenders.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must submit a completed Application for Federal Assistance (Standard Form 424), including signed assurances that it will comply with statutory and administrative requirements. The applicant is also required to submit a description that includes the goals of the program, the implementation process, timetable for implementation, how the State will coordinate substance abuse treatment activities at the State and local levels, and the State's law or policy requiring substance abuse testing of individuals in correctional residential substance abuse treatment programs.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Grant funds are allocated to the States using the following formula: (1) each participating State is allocated a base amount of 0.4 percent of the total funds available for the program; and (2) the remaining funds are allocated to each participating State in the ratio its prison population bears to the total prison population of all participating States. The most recent National Prisoner Statistics collected by the Bureau of Justice Statistics will be used to make these allocations. The Federal share of a grant-funded project may not exceed 75 percent the total costs of the project. The 25 percent matching funds must be in the form of a cash match.

 

16.594 Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Tuberculosis in Correctional Institutions

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, Public Law 103-322, Title III, Subtitle V, Section 32201, as amended codified at 42 USC 13911.

OBJECTIVES: To assist States, units of local government, and Indian tribal authorities in establishing and operating programs for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care of tuberculosis among inmates of correctional institutions.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: The Tuberculosis Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment grant funds may be used to assist State, tribal, and local correctional and public health authorities in establishing and operating programs for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care of tuberculosis (TB) among inmates of correctional institutions.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: States, Indian tribal authorities, and local correctional and public health authorities.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: States, Indian tribal authorities, and local correctional and public health authorities are eligible to apply.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must submit a completed Application for Federal Assistance (Standard Form 424), which shall include signed assurances that it will comply with statutory and administrative requirements. The applicant is also required to submit a description of the program, the implementation process, the timetable for implementation, and how the State will coordinate corrections and public health activities related to TB prevention, diagnosis and control at the State and local levels.

MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: The Federal share of a funded project may not exceed 50 percent of the total project costs.

 

16.596 Correctional Grant Program for Indian Tribes

AUTHORIZATION: Omnibus Consolidated Rescissions and Appropriations Act of 1996, Section 114, Public Law 104-134; Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, Title II, Subtitle A, Public Law 103-322, as amended, 42 USC 13709.

OBJECTIVES: To assist Indian tribes with the construction of jails on tribal lands for the incarceration of offenders subject to tribal jurisdiction.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: The Grant Program for Indian Tribes may be used to assist Indian tribes in developing or expanding jail facilities for both adult and juvenile offenders.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Indian tribes may apply. An Indian tribe is defined as any Indian or Alaska Native tribe, band, nation, pueblo, village, or community that the Secretary of the Interior acknowledges to exist as an Indian tribe pursuant to Public Law 103-454, 108 Stat. 4791, and which performs law enforcement functions as determined by the Secretary of the Interior.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Indian tribes may apply. An Indian tribe is defined as any Indian or Alaska Native tribe, band, nation, pueblo, village, or community that the Secretary of the Interior acknowledges to exist as an Indian tribe pursuant to Public Law 103-454, 108 Stat. 4791, and which performs law enforcement functions as determined by the Secretary of the Interior.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must submit a completed Application for Federal Assistance (Standard Form 424), including signed assurances that it will comply with statutory and administrative requirements. The applicant is also required to submit a description of the program, the implementation process, and a timetable for implementation.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: The Federal share of a grant-funded program may not exceed 90 percent of the total costs of the project.



VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN OFFICE

 

16.524 Legal Assistance for Victims

AUTHORIZATION: Violence Against Women Act of 2000, Public Law 106-368, Section 1201, codified at 42 USC 3796gg-6.

OBJECTIVES: These grants are for increasing the availability of direct legal services to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking in matters arising from the abuse or violence. The goal is to develop innovative, collaborative programs within the legal system that promote victim safety.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: The Legal Assistance for Victims Grant Program provides an opportunity for communities to enhance legal assistance for victims. Funds may be used: (1) to implement, expand, and establish cooperative efforts and projects between domestic violence and sexual assault victim services organizations and legal assistance providers to provide legal assistance for victims of domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault; (2) to implement, expand, and establish efforts and projects to provide legal assistance for victims of domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault by organizations with a demonstrated history of providing direct legal or advocacy services on behalf of these victims; and (3) to provide training, technical assistance, and data collection to improve the capacity of grantees and other entities to offer legal assistance to victims of domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Eligible grantees for this program are private, nonprofit entities, Indian tribal governments, and publicly funded organizations not acting in their governmental capacity. Grantees must certify that any person providing legal assistance has completed or will complete training that was developed with a domestic violence or sexual assault coalition or program and that the grantee's policies do not require mediation or counseling of offenders and victims together.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Beneficiaries include public or private nonprofit entities providing legal assistance primarily to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments, and OMB Circular No. A-110 for Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals and Other Nonprofit Organizations.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: This is not a formula grant program. Grants will be made for amounts up to 100 percent of the costs of the project contained in the approved applications. Matching is not required for this grant program; however applicants are encouraged to maximize the impact of Federal grant dollars by contributing to the costs of their projects. Supplemental contributions may be cash, in-kind services, or a combination of both.

 

16.525 Grants to Reduce Violent Crimes Against Women on Campus

AUTHORIZATION: Title VIII, Part E, of the Higher Education Amendments of 1998, Public Law 105-244, as amended by the Violence Against Women Act of 2000, Public Law 106-386, codified at 20 USC 1152.

OBJECTIVES: To encourage institutions of higher education to adopt comprehensive, coordinated responses to violence against women, including sexual assault, stalking, dating and domestic violence. Funds are authorized to enhance the apprehension, investigation, and adjudication of persons committing violent crimes against women on campuses; train campus administrators, security personnel, and disciplinary or judicial boards to effectively identify and respond to violent crimes against women on campuses; implement and operate education programs for the prevention of violent crimes against women on campuses; develop, enlarge or strengthen support services for victims; create, disseminate, or otherwise provide assistance and information about victims' options on and off campus to bring disciplinary or other legal action; develop and implement more effective campus policies, protocols, orders, and services specifically devoted to prevent, identify, and respond to violent crimes against women on campuses; develop, install, or expand data collection and communication systems, including computerized systems, linking campus security to the local law enforcement for the purpose of identifying and tracking arrests, protection orders, violations of protection orders, prosecutions, and convictions; develop, enlarge or strengthen victim service programs for the campus and to improve the delivery of victim services on campus, including assistance in immigration matters; provide capital improvements (including improved lighting and communication facilities but excluding construction of buildings) on campuses to address violent crimes against women; and to support improved coordination among campus administrators, campus security personnel, and local law enforcement to reduce violent crimes against women on campuses.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: This discretionary grant program is intended to assist institutions of higher education to develop comprehensive, multi-disciplinary responses to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking on campuses. An institution of higher education shall not be entitled to funds under this program unless it is in compliance with the campus crime reporting requirements set forth in 20 USC 1092 (f) as amended by Public Law 105-244, 112 Stat. 1581, Sec. 486 (e)(1998).

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Institutions of higher education as defined under the Higher Education Amendments of 1998 that are in compliance with the campus crime reporting requirements set forth in 20 USC 1092 (f) as amended by Public Law 105-244, 112 Stat. 1581, Sec. 486 (e) (1998). A consortium of institutions of higher education may also apply for these grants provided that each individual consortium member is also eligible to apply.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Institutions of higher education.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments, and OMB Circular No. A-110 for Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Nonprofit Organizations.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Grants will be made for amounts up to 100 percent of the costs of the programs or projects contained in the approved applications. Matching is not required for this grant program; however, applicants are encouraged to maximize the impact of Federal grant dollars by contributing to the costs of their projects. Supplemental contributions may be cash, in-kind services, or a combination of both.

 

16.587 Violence Against Women Discretionary Grants for Indian Tribal Governments

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994; codified at Sections 2001-6, codified as amended at 42 USC 3796gg, et seq.; Violence Against Women Act of 2000, P.L. 106-386.

OBJECTIVES: To assist Indian tribal governments to develop and strengthen effective law enforcement and prosecution strategies to combat violent crimes against women, and to develop and strengthen victim services in cases involving violent crimes against women.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: This discretionary grant program is intended to complement and enhance the Law Enforcement and Prosecution Formula Grants to Reduce Violent Crimes Against Women. An Indian tribal government shall not be entitled to funds under this program unless it (or another governmental entity) incurs the full out of pocket costs of forensic medical examinations for victims of sexual assault. In addition, an Indian tribal government shall not be entitled to funds under this program unless it: (1) certifies that its laws, policies, and practices do not require, in connection with the prosecution of any misdemeanor or felony domestic violence offense, or in connection with the filing, issuance, registration, or service of a protection order, or a petition for a protection order, to protect a victim of domestic violence, stalking, or sexual assault, that the victim bear the costs associated with the filing of criminal charges against the offender, or the costs associated with the filing, issuance, registration, or service of a warrant, protection order, petition for a protection order, or witness subpoena, whether issued inside or outside the tribal jurisdiction; or (2) assures the Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs that its laws, policies, and practices will be in compliance with these provisions by the date on which the next session of the tribal legislature ends or October 28, 2002. Grants shall provide personnel, training, technical assistance, data collection and other equipment for the most widespread apprehension, prosecution, and adjudication of persons committing violent crimes against women. Applicant Indian tribal governments that have law enforcement authority must certify that at least 25 percent of the total grant award be allocated respectively to law enforcement and prosecution, at least 30 percent to nonprofit, non-governmental victim services programs, and at least 5 percent to tribal courts. Tribal governments that do not have law enforcement, prosecution or tribal courts are not required to allocate funds to these areas.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: OJP's Violence Against Women Office will accept applications for the STOP Violence Against Indian Women Discretionary Grant Program from current grantees and new Applicants for fiscal year 2001.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: All Indian tribal governments are eligible to apply. The term Indian tribe means a tribe, band, pueblo, nation, or other organized group or community of Indians, including any Alaska Native village or regional or village corporation as defined in, or established pursuant to, the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 USC 1601 et seq.), that is recognized as eligible for the special programs and services provided by the United States to Indians because of their status as Indians.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular A-87 for State and local governments, and OMB Circular A-110 for Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Nonprofit Organizations.

MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: A grant made to an Indian tribal government under this program may not exceed 75 percent of the total cost of the projects described in the application. Applicants should submit a budget which includes the source of the 25 percent matching funds. An Indian tribal government may satisfy this 25 percent match through in-kind services. Indian tribal governments may meet the 25 percent matching requirement for this program by using funds appropriated by Congress for the activities of any agency of an Indian tribal government or for the activities of the Bureau of Indian Affairs performing law enforcement functions on any Indian lands. All funds designated as match are restricted to the same uses as the Violence Against Women Program funds and must be expended within the grant period.

 

16.588 Formula Grants

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994; Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, as amended, Sections 2001-6, codified as amended at 42 USC 3796gg. et. seq. to gg5.

OBJECTIVES: To assist States, Indian tribal governments, tribal courts, State and local courts, and units of local government to develop and strengthen effective law enforcement and prosecution strategies to combat violent crimes against women, and to develop and strengthen victim services in cases involving crimes against women. The Program encourages the development and implementation of effective, victim-centered law enforcement, prosecution, and court strategies to address violent crimes against women and the development and enhancement of victim services in cases involving violent crimes against women.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: A State, Indian tribal government, or unit of local government shall not be entitled to funds under this program unless the State, Indian tribal government, or another governmental entity incurs the full out-of-pocket cost of forensic medical examinations for victims of sexual assault. Further, a State shall not be entitled to funds under this program unless it: (1) certifies that its laws, policies, and practices do not require, in connection with the prosecution of any misdemeanor or felony domestic violence offense, or in connection with the filing, issuance, registration, or service of a protection order, or a petition for a protection order, to protect a victim of domestic violence, stalking, or sexual assault, that the victim bear the costs associated with the filing of criminal charges against the offender, or the costs associated with the filing, issuance, registration, or service of a warrant, protection order, petition for a protection order, or witness subpoena, whether issued inside or outside the tribal jurisdiction; or (2) assures the Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Justice Programs that its laws, policies, and practices will be in compliance with these provisions by the date on which the next session of the tribal legislature ends or October 28, 2002. Grants shall provide personnel, training, technical assistance, data collection and other equipment for the most widespread apprehension, prosecution, and adjudication of persons committing violent crimes against women. States must allocate a minimum of 25 percent of each year's grant award to each of the following areas: prosecution and law enforcement. In addition, States must allocate a minimum of 30 percent to victim services, a minimum of 5 percent to courts, and 15 percent to discretionary within the statutory purpose areas.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: All States, Commonwealths, territories and possessions of the United States, as well as the District of Columbia, are eligible. Funds will be subgranted to units of local government, courts, nonprofit nongovernmental victim services programs, and Indian tribal governments.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local units of government, nonprofit nongovernmental victim services programs, courts, and Indian tribal governments.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments, and OMB Circular No. A-110 for Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals and Other Nonprofit Organizations.

MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: The Federal share of these grants may not exceed 75 percent of the total costs of the projects described in the applications. States may satisfy this 25 percent match through in-kind services. Indian tribes that are subgrantees of a State under this program may meet the 25 percent matching requirement for this program by using funds appropriated by Congress for the activities of any agency of an Indian tribal government or for the activities of the Bureau of Indian Affair performing law enforcement functions on any Indian lands. All funds designated as match are restricted to the same uses as the Violence Against Women Program funds and must be expended within the grant period.

 

16.589 Rural Domestic Violence and Child Victimization Enforcement Grant Program

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, Public Law103-322, Section 40295, 42 USC 13971; Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, as amended by Public Law 106-386, §1105 (1), codified at 42 USC 13971.

OBJECTIVES: To implement, expand, and establish cooperative efforts and projects between law enforcement officers, prosecutors, victim advocacy groups, and other related parties to investigate and prosecute incidents of domestic violence, dating violence and child abuse; provide treatment, counseling and assistance to victims of domestic violence, dating violence and child victimization, including in immigration matters; and work in cooperation with the community to develop education and prevention strategies directed toward such issues.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Grants are available to States, Indian tribal governments, local governments of rural States, and other public or private entities of rural States. For the purposes of this grant program, a rural State is a State that has a population density of 52 or fewer persons per square mile or a State in which the largest county has fewer than 150,000 people, based on the decennial census of 1990 through fiscal year 1997. Nineteen States qualify as rural for the purposes of this grant program: Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, and Wyoming.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: State agencies in rural States may apply for assistance for Statewide projects. Local units of government in rural States and public and private entities in rural States also may apply directly for assistance. Only State agencies in non-rural States may apply for funding assistance. These agencies may apply on behalf of one or more of their rural jurisdictions. Rural and/or non-rural States also may submit joint applications for projects that would be implemented in more than one State. Indian tribal governments may make individual applications or apply as a consortium. A tribal government also may apply for assistance on behalf of a non-tribal government organization. Proposals will be accepted from new applicants as well as from current grantees requesting continuation funds.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Beneficiaries include criminal and tribal justice practitioners and service providers who respond to victims of violent crimes committed against women in rural jurisdictions and Indian country, and rural and tribal communities in general.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments, and OMB Circular No. A-110 for Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals and Other Nonprofit Organizations.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Grants will be made for amounts up to 100 percent of the costs of the programs or projects contained in the approved applications. Match is not required for this grant program; however, applicants are encouraged to maximize the impact of Federal grant dollars by contributing to the costs of their projects. Supplemental contributions may be cash, in-kind services, or a combination of both.

 

16.590 Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies and Enforcement of Protection Orders

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, codified as amended at 42 USC 3796hh.; Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, Section 40152, as amended, Violence Against Women Act of 2000, P.L. 106-386.

OBJECTIVES: To implement mandatory arrest or pro-arrest programs and policies in police departments, including mandatory arrest programs and policies for protection order violations, as part of a coordinated community response to domestic violence; to develop policies, educational programs, and training programs in police departments to improve tracking of cases involving domestic violence and dating violence; to centralize and coordinate police enforcement, prosecution, probation, parole and/or judicial responsibility for domestic violence cases in groups or units of police officers, prosecutors, probation and parole officers, or judges; to coordinate computer tracking systems to ensure communication between police, prosecutors, parole and probation officers and both criminal and family courts; to strengthen legal advocacy service programs for victims of domestic violence and dating violence, including strengthening assistance to such victims in immigration matters; and to educate judges in criminal and other courts about domestic violence and to improve judicial handling of such cases; to provide technical assistance and computer and other equipment to police departments, prosecutors, courts, and tribal jurisdictions to facilitate the widespread enforcement of protection orders, including interstate enforcement, enforcement between States and tribal jurisdictions, and enforcement between tribal jurisdictions; to develop or strengthen policies and training for police, prosecutors, and the judiciary in recognizing, investigating, and prosecuting instances of domestic violence and sexual assault against older individuals and individuals with disabilities.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Grants are available to States, State and local courts, Indian tribal governments, and units of local governments to encourage them to treat domestic violence as a serious violation of criminal law.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Eligible grantees are States, Indian tribal governments, State or local courts, or units of local governments that: (1) certify that their laws or official policies encourage or mandate arrests of domestic violence offenders based on probable cause that an offense has been committed, and encourage or mandate arrest of domestic violence offenders who violate the terms of a valid and outstanding protection order; (2) demonstrate that their laws, policies, or practices and their training programs discourage dual arrest of the offender and the victim; (3) certify that their laws, policies, or practices prohibit issuance of mutual restraining orders of protection except in cases where both spouses file a claim and the court makes detailed findings of fact indicating that both spouses acted primarily as aggressors and that neither spouse acted primarily in self-defense; and (4) certify that their laws, policies, or practices do not require, in connection with the prosecution of any misdemeanor or felony domestic violence offense, or in connection with the filing, issuance, registration, or service of a protection order, or a petition for a protection order, to protect a victim of domestic violence, stalking, or sexual assault, that the victim bear the costs associated with the filing of criminal charges against the offender, or the costs associated with the filing, issuance, registration, or service of a warrant, protection order, petition for a protection order, or witness subpoena, whether issued inside or outside the State, tribal or local jurisdiction.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Beneficiaries include criminal and tribal justice practitioners, domestic violence victims advocates, and other service providers who respond to victims of domestic violence.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments, and OMB Circular No. A-110 for Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals and Other Nonprofit Organizations.

MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: Grants will be made for amounts up to 100 percent of the costs of the programs or projects contained in the approved applications. Match is not required for this grant program; however, applicants are encouraged to maximize the impact of Federal dollars by contributing to the cost of the project. Supplemental contributions may be cash, in-kind services, or a combination of both.

 

16.591 Managing Released Sex Offenders

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, Public Law 103-322, Section 40152, codified at 42 USC13941; Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, as amended.

OBJECTIVES: To establish criteria and provide training and technical assistance on case management, supervision, and relapse prevention to assist probation and parole officers and other criminal justice practitioners who interact with released sex offenders.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: One grant or cooperative agreement will be awarded to develop and deliver a national training and technical assistance program.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: An agency or organization with the capacity to develop and deliver a national training and technical assistance program that has been invited to submit an application.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Beneficiaries include probation and parole officers and other criminal justice practitioners who interact with released sex offenders.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Costs will be determined in accordance with OMB Circular No.A-87 for State and local governments, and OMB Circular No. A-21 for Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals and OMB Circular No. A-122 for Other Nonprofit Organizations.

MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: A grant will be made for up to 100 percent of the costs of the program or project contained in the approved application. Match is not required for this grant program; however, the applicant will be encouraged to maximize the impact of Federal dollars by contributing to the cost of the project. Supplemental contributions may be cash, in-kind services, or a combination of both.



EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF WEED AND SEED

 

16.595 Executive Office for Weed and Seed (Weed and Seed Program)

AUTHORIZATION: FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law 106-553.

OBJECTIVES: The Program's objective is national implementation of Operation Weed and Seed. Operation Weed and Seed is a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary approach to combating violent crime, drug use, and gang activity in high crime neighborhoods. The goal is to "weed out" violence and drug activity in high crime neighborhoods, and then to "seed" the sites with a wide range of crime and drug prevention programs, human service resources, and neighborhood restoration activities to prevent crime from reoccurring. The strategy emphasizes the importance of a coordinated approach, bringing together Federal, State and local government, the community, and the private sector to form a partnership to create a safe, drug-free environment.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Weed and Seed funding is for intergovernmental agreements, including grants, cooperative agreements, and contracts, with State and local law enforcement agencies engaged in the investigation and prosecution of violent crimes and drug offenses in "Weed and Seed" designated communities, and for either reimbursements or transfers to appropriation accounts of the Department of Justice and other Federal agencies which shall be specified by the Attorney General to execute the "Weed and Seed" program strategy.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: The eligible applicant is a coalition of community residents, local, county, and State agencies, Federal agencies, and the private sector.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: Eligibility criteria for selecting and funding Weed and Seed sites are as follows: high incidence of violent crime; existing, workable community infrastructure; cooperative governmental partnerships; good cooperation between governmental, private civic, and social service organizations; a cooperative business community; a strong U.S. Attorney Office; and a history of innovative programming at the local level. If a large city is being considered, the project site should be a clearly, easily identifiable section of the metropolitan area. The strategy also seeks to encompass available funding from reprogrammable Federal program dollars and existing private/local matching funds.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: An interested community should establish contact with the United States Attorney who convenes a formal steering committee. The steering committee, through the guidance and facilitation of the United States Attorney, produces an implementation plan along the lines set forth in the Weed and Seed Implementation Manual.

MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: While there is currently no specified level of matching funds, the nature of the program anticipates significant contributions from the public and private sectors of participating local communities.



OFFICE FOR DOMESTIC PREPAREDNESS

 

16.007 State Domestic Preparedness Equipment Support Program

AUTHORIZATION: Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, Public Law 104- 132, Section 819, 15 USC 2201 and 42 USC 3751 (b) (26) and FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law 106-553.

OBJECTIVES: Funding will be provided to plan for and execute a comprehensive threat and needs assessment, to develop a 3-year plan to enhance first responder capabilities, and to provide for equipment purchases and the provision of specialized training. USES AND RESTRICTIONS: The funds may be used to procure equipment subsequent to the findings that are developed in the statewide threat and needs assessment. Grant funds must be used to equip fire and emergency medical services, law enforcement agencies, and hazardous materials units to respond to a Weapons of Mass Destruction terrorist incident.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Applicants are the States.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local governments.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must complete a grant application package and adhere to its requirements. The application must include: (1) Standard Form 424 which must be signed by the CEO of the applicant jurisdiction (county or city); (2) program narrative containing a problem statement regarding general threat and capability needs of their jurisdiction to respond to incidents of terrorism; (3) a description of any previous support the jurisdiction may have received from the Office of Justice Programs (OJP), U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS); (4) specific goals and objectives it would like to achieve through the equipment procurement project; (5) an implementation and evaluation plan; (6) a program management structure that will be used to oversee the administration of grant funds; and (7) Reporting Requirements. States must conduct a statewide threat and needs assessment prior to receiving grant funds. Additional funding will be provided to defer each State's cost associated with planning for and administering the State threat and needs assessment. Results of the needs assessment will prioritize equipment purchases and training and technical assistance requirement for each jurisdiction within the State. States will also provide a 3-year plan for fiscal year 1999, fiscal year 2000, and fiscal year 2001. These 3-year plans will identify goals, objectives, and milestones for equipment purchases and training. Equipment acquired under this grant program will be used in conjunction with the mutual aid agreements of the jurisdiction within the state, and to the extent possible, will demonstrate integration of the jurisdiction's equipment purchase plan (s) with the planning guidelines set forth in the State's Terrorism Consequence Management Plan for which the State may have received funding from the FEMA in FY 1999 to develop such a plan. The applicant must demonstrate coordination of planning for these equipment purchases with geographically contiguous jurisdictions, as well as with the response disciplines; e.g., fire, emergency medical services, hazardous materials units, and law enforcement, within the jurisdiction.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: None

 

16.008 State and Local Domestic Preparedness Training Program

AUTHORIZATION: Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 Public Law 104-132, Section 819, 42 USC 3751 (b) (26) and FY 2001 Appropriations Act, Public Law 106-553.

OBJECTIVES: To provide training to State and local jurisdictions to respond to Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) domestic terrorist incidents involving nuclear, biological, chemical, and explosive devices.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Grants may be used to develop and conduct training courses.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are the Chief Executive Officers (CE0s) for the following four members of the National Domestic Preparedness Consortium; the Energetic Materials Research and Test Center, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; Louisiana State University; the National Exercise, Test, and Training Center, Nevada Test Site, Department of Energy; and the National Emergency Response and Rescue Training Center, Texas Engineering Extension Service, Texas A&M University. Applicants may also be public or private nonprofit agencies or for-profit agencies providing or coordinating with programs, which will provide a full range of domestic preparedness services for first responders.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local units of government.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must complete a grant application package and adhere to its requirements. The application must include: (1) Standard Form 424 which must be signed by the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the applicant institution/company or jurisdiction; (2) program narrative containing the program plan. This plan should detail all activities to be conducted during the fiscal year, including training courses which will be provided, the anticipated number of personnel to be trained in those courses, and all non-training activities which will be conducted; (3) course description; (4) course schedule; (5) equipment plan, if relevant; (6) project management structure; (7) Fiscal Year 2001 Program Budget; (8) Assurances; (9) Certifications; and (10) Reporting Requirements.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: None.

 

16.009 State and Local Domestic Preparedness Exercise Support

AUTHORIZATION: Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, Public Law 104-132, Section 819, 42 USC 3751 (b)(26) and FY 2001 Appropriation Act, Public Law 106-553.

OBJECTIVES: To provide exercise planning to State and local jurisdictions and to conduct national, State, and local exercises for response to Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) domestic terrorist incidents involving nuclear, biological, chemical, and explosive devices.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Grants may be used for exercise planning and conducting national, State, and local exercises.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are State and local jurisdictions. Applicants may also be a public or private nonprofit agency or for profit agency providing or coordinating with programs, which will provide a full-range of domestic preparedness services for first responders.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local units of government.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must complete a grant application package and adhere to its requirements. The application must include: (1) Standard Form 424 which must be signed by the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the applicant jurisdiction; (2) program narrative containing the program plan; (3) project management structure; (4) Fiscal Year 2001 Program Budget; (5) Assurances; (6) Certifications; and (7) Reporting Requirements.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: None.

 

16.010 State and Local Domestic Preparedness Technical Assistance

AUTHORIZATION: Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, Public Law 104-132, Section 819, 42 USC 3751 (b)(26) and FY 2001 Appropriation Act, Public Law 106-553.

OBJECTIVES: To provide direct assistance to State and local jurisdictions in enhancing their capacity and preparedness to respond to Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) domestic terrorist incidents involving nuclear, biological, chemical, and explosive devices. The program goals are to enhance the ability of State and local jurisdictions to develop, plan and implement a program for WMD preparedness and to sustain and maintain specialized equipment.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: Grants may be used to provide assistance to State and local units of government in developing, planning, and implementing a program for WMD preparedness.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Applicants may be a public or private nonprofit agency or for profit agency providing or coordinating with programs which will provide a full range of domestic preparedness services for first responders.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: State and local units of government.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: The applicant must complete a grant application package and adhere to its requirements. The application must include: (1) Standard Form 424 which must be signed by the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the applicant jurisdiction; (2) program narrative containing the program plan and project management structure; (3) Fiscal Year 2001 Program Budget; (4) Assurances; (5) Certifications; and (6) Reporting Requirements.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: None

 

16.599 Local Firefighting and Emergency Services Training

AUTHORIZATION: Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996, Public Law 104-132, Section 819,15 USC 2201.

OBJECTIVES: To provide specialized training and equipment to enhance the capability of metropolitan fire and emergency service departments to respond to terrorist attacks, and fund demonstration sites in urban communities where innovative fire and emergency services training programs may be replicated in other communities.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: To enhance readiness and preparedness of fire and emergency services personnel to respond to terrorist incidents of mass destruction where incendiary devices, nuclear, biological or chemical agents are utilized. The training program and the demonstration program will work in concert with other Federal agencies, specifically the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Department of Defense (DOD), and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) which have similar objectives. The primary recipient of the local firefighting training program will be metropolitan areas of the United States encompassing approximately 120 of the largest U.S. jurisdictions. The recipients of the fire and emergency services demonstration grants will receive funding to demonstrate and document relevant fire and emergency training services that show promise and demonstrates sound planning for multi agency responses in response to terrorist attacks.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS: Urban metropolitan jurisdictions who desire training or who have the capacity to establish effective fire and emergency services to respond to terrorist attacks.

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: Applicants requesting funding must comprise of an urban metropolitan area with the capability to respond to terrorist attacks on a broad scale utilizing a mix of fire and emergency services.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: States, units of local governments, and U.S. Territories.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Applications for funding under the Anti-Terrorism and Death Penalty Act of 1996, for fire and emergency services training must submit a request in writing that describes: (1) the jurisdiction's current fire and emergency services capability (2) the number and type of agencies providing services (3) population and geographic area of the jurisdiction (4) an assessment of the jurisdiction's vulnerability from potential terrorist activity that might include probable targets, such as specific buildings, roads, dams, bridges or other structures; and( 5) the extent to which fire and emergency services could be disrupted in the event of a terrorist attack and the impact that would have on the jurisdiction's ability to provide fire and emergency services. Applications for demonstration grants to establish model programs that have the potential for becoming fire and emergency services programs other jurisdictions could replicate must also be submitted in writing. In addition to paragraphs 1 and 4 above, the applicant must also explain how and to what capacity fire and emergency services would be enhanced with demonstration grant funding.

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: None.

 



POLICE CORPS

16.712 Police Corps and Law Enforcement Officers Training and Education

AUTHORIZATION: Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act codified at Sections 200102 et. seq. 42 USC 14091 et. seq. of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968, as amended.

OBJECTIVES: To address violent crime by increasing the number of police with advanced education assigned to community patrol in areas of great need, and to provide educational assistance to students who possess a sincere interest in public service through law enforcement and to law enforcement personnel.

USES AND USE RESTRICTIONS: (a) Educational assistance: Police Corps participants must complete education, training and service requirements. All participants must successfully complete the 16-24 week Police Corps training program and serve for four years on community patrol with a State or local police force in a participating State. Undergraduate participants first must attend college on a full-time basis and earn a baccalaureate degree. Participants who pursue graduate study must complete their service and training obligations in advance. Educational assistance is based on participants' actual educational expenses; no participant may receive more than $30,000 under the program. (b) Cash assistance to police forces: State and local police and sheriffs' departments that employ Police Corps participants receive $10,000 for each of a participant's first four years of service. No department may receive a cash payment for any year in which its average size has declined by more than 2 percent since January 1, 1993, or in which it has laid off officers. No more than 10 percent of a State's Police Corps participants may be assigned to a statewide police force. (c) Training cost reimbursements are paid only to State training facilities approved to offer the Police Corps training program or its substantial equivalent. (d) Educational assistance to dependents of officers killed in the line of duty is based on actual expenses for college education and the four year service obligation is waived; no dependent may receive more than $30,000 under the program.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

APPLICANT ELIGIBILITY: (a) States: All States are eligible to submit a State plan. (b) State and local police forces: Law enforcement agencies within participating States are eligible to hire Police Corps participants. No participant may be assigned to serve with a local force whose size has declined by more than 5 percent since June 21, 1989, or which has members who have been laid off but not rehired. (c) Participants: Participants must be citizens of the United States or aliens lawfully admitted for permanent residence, possess the necessary mental and physical capabilities and moral characteristics to be an effective police officer, be of good character, meet the standards of the police force with which they will serve, and demonstrate sincere motivation and dedication to law enforcement and public service. Applicants are selected on a competitive basis. (d) Assistance to dependents of officers killed in the line of duty: Eligible dependents must be a natural or adopted child or stepchild of a law enforcement officer who served in a State that participates in the Police Corps and who was slain after the state had an approved Police Corps state plan.

BENEFICIARY ELIGIBILITY: States, State and local police forces, and individuals as outlined above.

CREDENTIALS/DOCUMENTATION: Information on documentation required in State plans can be obtained from the Office of the Police Corps (Headquarters). Interested individuals and law enforcement agencies should contact the State lead agency for specific requirements. A list of State lead agencies is available from the Office of the Police Corps (Headquarters).

FORMULA AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS: This program has no matching requirements.


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